grad_com

 

An electronic newsletter from the BSU School of Graduate Studies

Vol. 5, No. 2

July 2008

 

The Process

Registration: Grad classes

Starting the count of seven years to complete a degree

Form 1: Applying for admission to graduate studies

Completing 13-16 graduate credits after admission

Form 2: Applying for candidacy in a graduate degree program

Taking the written exam at the end of course work

Form 3: Proposing a research paper or thesis

Doing the work and writing the results

Form 4: Applying for graduation

Submitting the research paper or thesis for review

Form 5: Scheduling the oral examination

Defending your graduate work

Diploma

 

This month . . .

·      The Scoop on I’s and IP’s

·      Q&A: Question of the Month?

 

Sifting through the Confusion – I’s and IP’s

Hello there!  I’m Patty, the GA from the School of Graduate Studies.  During my time here at BSU, I, like many students, have experienced the frustration and anxiety of having “I’s” and “IP’s”. 

Alongside my classmates, I have been confused by their function beyond the fact that they are submitted when I have not completed coursework within a semester.  I have been uncertain of timelines and terrified of not completing coursework by an undetermined due date, which would lead to an “F” on my grade report.  (I happen to be “F”-phobic, as many of us are.)

In order to clarify misunderstandings and lack of information, our gracious Registrar, Dave Carlson, has been kind enough to present the truth about I’s and IP’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’s – “Incomplete” Grades

An “I” is issued at the end of a regular course if the student has been unable to complete the coursework during the allotted time, usually one full semester (in the case of summer, time allotted includes both Session I and Session II). 

Whether or not an “I” will be issued for a course is at the professor’s discretion.

Under general regulations, an “I” extends the student’s allotted time 20 days into the next semester (or summer sessions). 

After the 20 days, the professor is in no way obligated to change the grade, and it will be issued as an “F” by the end of the semester.* 

* Note: Though policies indicate specific time deadlines, the professor may choose to extend the time restrictions at their own discretion.  This allows professors and students to negotiate extenuating circumstances and time frames according to their own needs, rather than being strictly confined by regulations of University policy.

IP’s – “In Progress” Grades

An “IP” is issued at the end of a regular semester (or Summer Session I and Session II) if the student has been unable to complete the coursework during the semester. 

An “IP” is usually issued for courses that are not necessarily expected to be completed within a semester, such as a thesis, research paper, or capstone projects. 

Whether or not an “IP” will be issued is at the professor’s discretion. 

Under general regulations, an “IP” extends the student’s allotted time two years from when the student registered for the coursework.  (e.g. If the student registered for the course for Fall 2007, they would have until the end of Summer 2009 to complete the work to the professor’s satisfaction.) 

After the two years, the professor is in no way obligated to change the grade, and it will be issued as an “F” by the end of the semester.*

 

 

Q&A: Question of the month?

Q: Who should I talk to about grade questions?

A: Dave Carlson, the Registrar, is happy to tackle questions about I’s, IP’s, or any additional questions about grades that students may have.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional Information

There is no difference how I’s or IP’s are handled between graduate students and undergraduate students.  Graduate students simply have more IP’s because they are more likely to be enrolled in unconventional courses. 

If a student has an agreement with a professor about the handling of an “I,” “IP,” or “F,” but the professor leaves the institution, the Records office is not obligated to honor any such agreements unless the student is able to obtain written permission from the professor to have the grade changed. 

I’s, IP’s, and the Library

If students have an “I” or an “IP,” graduate students can still register for the UNIV 6000 to keep their library barcode active.  If they do not register for UNIV 6000 and they have no other classes during the semester, students are restricted from being able to check out materials, access electronic resources remotely, or use printing resources.

If you have questions about I’s or IP’s that are not answered in this newsletter, please contact the Records office (218-755-2020) or contact Dave Carlson (dcarlson@bemidjistate.edu).

We want to make grad_com useful for you. Let us know what you would like to see on these pages by contacting the School of Graduate Studies, Decker Hall 110, 218-755-2027 (toll-free: 1-888-386-8464), Grad@bemidjistate.edu