Dr. Debbie Guelda

Professor

Biology

Office: S

Phone: (218) 755-2786

Box #: 27

Email: dguelda@bemidjistate.edu

Degrees

  • University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 2001
    PhD, Environmental Science
    Dissertation: Zooplankton community structure and function in the Ohio River watershed.
  • University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 2001
    MS, Aquatic Ecology
  • University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, 1996
    BA, Biology
  • Member; Mortar Board Honor Society

Teaching

  • Limnology
  • Freshwater Invertebrate Zoology
  • Entomology
  • Introductory Biology II
  • Animal Behavior
  • Advanced Projects

Research Interests

Dr. Debbie Guelda is an aquatic ecologist and specifically a river researcher at heart. Her graduate research concentrated on invertebrates in the lower Ohio watershed, particularly zooplankton. She is interested in how populations of plankton change in a river continuum both temporally and spatially. She brought this research to northern Minnesota where she is interested in how zooplankton communities change while traveling through Mississippi river-lake sequences.

She is also interested in how planktonic (open water) invertebrates are energetically linked to benthic (bottom-dwelling) invertebrates in these systems. Her research has been presented both nationally and internationally at meetings of the North American Benthological Society (Vancouver, BC, Anchorage, Alaska) and the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (Copenhagen, Denmark and Santiago de Compostela, Spain).

Recent Work

  • Phillips, M. D, D.L. Guelda and R.W. Koch. In prep. Spatial and temporal differences in Macroinvertebrates and Zooplankton Populations in teh Headwaters of the Mississippi River.
  • Koch, R.W., D.L. Guelda and P.A. Bukaveckas.2007.Importance of phytoplankton carbon to heterotrophic bacteria in the Ohio, Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers. Hydrobiologia.
  • Koch, R., D. Guelda and P. Bukaveckas. 2006. The importance of phytoplankton to heterotrophic bacteria in three large riverine systems: the Ohio River, Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley. Hydrobiologia.
  • Bukaveckas, P., D. Guelda, J. Jack, R. Koch, T. Sellers and J. Shostell. 2005. Effects of point source inputs, sub-basin delivery and longitudinal variation in material retention on C, N and P fluxes within the Ohio River Basin. Ecosystems 8: 825-840.
    Koch, R., P. Bukaveckas, and D. Guelda. 2005. Importance of phytoplankton carbon to heterotrophic bacteria in the Ohio, Cumberland and Tennessee rivers. In press. Hydrobiologia.
  • Guelda, D., R. Koch, J. Jack, and P. Bukaveckas. 2005. Experimental evidence for density-dependent effects and the importance of algal production in determining population growth rates of riverine zooplankton. River Research and Applications 21: (6) 595-608.
  • Koch, R., D. Guelda, and P. Bukaveckas. 2004. Phytoplankton growth in the Ohio, Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers, USA: inter-site differences in light and nutrient limitation. Aquatic Ecology 38: 17-26.
  • Greenwood, K., J. Thorp, R. Summers and D. Guelda. 2001. Effects of an exotic bivalve mollusk on benthic invertebrates and food quality in the Ohio River. Hydrobiologia 462: 169-172.

Other Information

Presentations
  • J. House, D.L. Guelda, C. Roy. 2013. Poster presentation. Comparison of metabolic rates of uninfected Bithynia tenticulata to those recently infected with the trematode Sphaeridiotrema. Freshwater Mollusck Conservation Society, April, 2013, Guntersville, AL.
  • M. Philips, D.L. Guelda, R. W. Koch. 2012. Poster presentation. Spatial and temporal differences in benthic macroinvertebrate and zooplankton diversity in the headwaters of the Mississippi river. Society of Freshwater Scientiest, May 20-24, 2012, Louisville, KY.
  • M. Philips, D.L. Guelda, R. W. Koch. 2010. Platform presentation. Spatial and temporal differences in benthic macroinvertebrate and zooplankton diversity in the headwaters of the Mississippi river. Mississippi River Research Consortium, April 21-23, 2010. Lacrosse, WI.
  • M.A. Thompson. D.L. Guelda. 2010. Poster presentation. The effect of riparian forest cover, riparian forest density, and stream geomorphology on large wood recruitment in a boreal forest stream ecosystem, Superior National Forest, Minnesota.The joint TWS, AFS, SAF, and SCB conference. March 1-3, 2010. Nisswa, MN.
  • Koch, R.W., D.Guelda, C. Goebel and B.J. Palik. 2006. Interactive effects of stream geomorphology, forest age and woody debris jams on nutrient processing in streams of northern hardwood forests. 2006 annual meeting of NABS, Anchorage, AK.
  • Guelda, D., R.W. Koch, J. Kragthorpe, C. Goebel and B. Palik. 2006. Influence of stream geomorphology, forest age and woody debris on stream macroinvertebrates in northern hardwood forests. 2006 annual meeting of NABS, Anchorage, AK.
  • Bukaveckas, P., Acharya, K, Jack, J. and D. Guelda. 2005. Evidence for nutritional constraints on zooplankton growth in riverine environments. American Society of Limnology and Oceanography: Santiago de Compostela, Spain.
  • Guelda, D. 2004. Riverine systems: structure, theory and transport. Invited talk. Bemidji State University, Continuing Research and Innovation. Invited talk.
  • T. Solem, D. Guelda, R. Koch. 2004. Stream macroinvertebrates associated with woody debris in northern hardwood forests: influence of geomorphology and forest age. North American Benthological Society. Vancouver, BC.
  • Koch, R, D. Guelda, J. Kragthorpe and B. Palik. 2004. Influence of geomorphology, forest age and woody debris on stream nutrient processing in northern hardwood forests. North American Benthological Society. Vancouver, BC.
  • Guelda, D. and E. Westrich. 2003. Spatial and temporal differences in transport of macro and microzooplankton in the Schoolcraft lake-river system. Mississippi River Research Consortium. LaCrosse, WI.
  • Guelda, D. 2002. Temporal and spatial variation in zooplankton flux rates in the Ohio River. Mississippi River Research Consortium. LaCrosse, WI.
  • Guelda, D. 2001. Riverine zooplankton: sources, sinks, and food limitation. Invited talk. Bemidji State University. Bemidji, MN.
  • Guelda, D. 2001. Zooplankton food limitation, and flux rates in the Ohio River. Invited talk. University of Louisville. Louisville, KY.
  • Guelda, D. and P.A. Bukaveckas. 2000. Competition and food limitation among predatory and herbivorous riverine zooplankton. American Society of Limnology and Oceanography: Oral presentation. Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • P.A. Bukaveckas, D. Guelda, R.W. Koch, and T. W. Sellers. 2000. Tributary inputs and transformations of C, N and P in a large river ecosystem. American Society of Limnology and Oceanography: Oral

Bio

When I was an undergraduate I began working in the Large River Lab at the University of Louisville. Our research centered on (you guessed it) working on large rivers such as the lower Ohio River and Tennessee, Wabash, Kentucky, and Green Rivers. It was at that time that I became very interested in not only the aquatic systems themselves, but the organisms that resided within those systems. Invertebrates became my organism of choice to work with, specifically zooplankton.

I graduated with my BA from U of L and stayed there to complete both a Master’s and Doctorate degree, all while focusing on invertebrates in riverine systems.

Since coming to BSU, my research has subtly changed and now I am working on benthic (bottom dwelling) invertebrates in streams as well as zooplankton in the familiar lake-river continuum that we see in Northern Minnesota. I currently work with several undergraduate and graduate students who share my interests in aquatic systems and the resident invertebrates.
I feel very, very lucky to have joined an amazing faculty in the Biology Department. I also feel that the Aquatic Biology program is fortunate to have, in addition to myself, the talents of Dr. Don Cloutman (fish guy) and Dr. Richard Koch (wetland guy). If I have to say so myself we make up quite a team.

I teach several courses at BSU and these include Introductory Biology II, Limnology II, Freshwater Invertebrates, Entomology, Animal Behavior, Marine Biology and Graduate Seminar. I fully believe that lecture and lab can be a LOT of fun as well as educational. I love coming to work and it is my hope that my students find as much joy in learning as I do in teaching.