Honors Program Announces Fall Honors Council Lecture Series

The Honors Program at Bemidji State University has announced the presentation schedule for its fall Honors Council Lecture Series.

The series provides BSU faculty with a forum to share their expertise and the results of their research with the Bemidji community. This fall also includes a special guest presenter on Sept. 21.

All Honors Council lectures are open to everyone free of charge.

The Honors Council Lecture Series is hosted by the Bemidji State University Honors Council, the advisory group to BSU’s honors program composed of 12 faculty members representing each of the university’s colleges. Student representatives are also elected to the council by their cohorts for one-year terms.

Sept. 14 — Carl Isaacson, assistant professor of environmental, Earth and space studies; “Environmental Endocrine Disruption, Reproductive Dysfunction and Population Level Effects.” 7:15 p.m., Hagg-Sauer 102.

Sept. 21 — Dr. Kenneth Stikkers, professor of philosophy and Africana studies, Southern Illinois University Carbondale; “To Preserve Their Freedom’:  What African American History Teaches the World About What It Means to Be Free.”

Sept. 28 — Dr. Jeanine McDermott, associate professor of nursing; Dr. Tiffany Hommes, associate professor of nursing; and Dr. Sheila Paul, associate professor of nursing; “Sustaining Lifelong Wellness.” 7:15 p.m., Hagg-Sauer 102.

Oct. 5 — Dr. Dennis Lunt, assistant professor of humanities; “Torture and American Philosophy.” 7:15 p.m., Hagg-Sauer 102.

Oct. 18 — Dr. Kelly La Venture, assistant professor of business administration; “Analyzing the economic impact and stakeholder perceptions of destination promotion: A case study of the ‘First City on the Mississippi’ as ‘True North.’” 7:15 p.m., Hagg-Sauer 102.

Nov. 1 — Dr. Jessica Durgan, assistant professor of English; “The Cultural Phenomenon of Color.” 7:15 p.m., Hagg-Sauer 102.

Nov. 13 — Dr. Mark Wallert, associate professor of biology; Kyle Bagnell, graduate student in biology; and Clarice Wallert, graduate student in biology; “The Na+-H+ Exchanger Isoform 1 as a Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Cancer.” 7:15 p.m., Hagg-Sauer 100.