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Job Outlook 2015 Released---U.S. College Hiring to Increase 8.3 Percent

2014/11/24

  • Job Outlook: U.S. College Hiring to Increase 8.3 Percent

    Spotlight for Career Services Professionals
    Spotlight for Recruiting Professionals
    November 12, 2014

    Employers plan to hire 8.3 percent more new college graduates from the Class of 2015 for their U.S. operations than they did from the Class of 2014, according to NACE’s Job Outlook 2015 report. (See Figure 1.)

    This year, more than one-quarter of respondents report that they also recruit college graduates for positions outside of the United States. The hiring projection for international positions is expected to increase by 3.2 percent for Class of 2015 graduates.

    Overall, employers plan to hire 7.5 percent more graduates from the Class of 2015 for both U.S. and international positions than they did from the Class of 2014.

    In terms of hiring expectations, the largest group of respondents expects to bring in more new college grads than they did last year, closely followed by those who expect to hold their college hiring levels steady. (See Figure 2.)

    The main reasons employers cited for increasing their college hiring numbers are business need/company growth and to account for anticipated retirements.

    By broad category, graduates of the business, engineering, computer and information sciences, and math and sciences disciplines are most in demand at the bachelor’s degree level, with finance, accounting, and computer science the individual majors most in demand among employers.

    Data for the Job Outlook 2015 survey was collected from August 11, 2014, through October 7, 2014. A total of 260 surveys were returned for a 25 percent response rate. The Job Outlook 2015 report is available atwww.naceweb.org/surveys/job-outlook.aspx or through the MyNACE area at www.naceweb.org/job-outlook/index.aspx.

- See more at: http://www.naceweb.org/s11122014/job-outlook-hiring-2015.aspx?linkedin-unpd-spot-johir-11102014#sthash.wa23QJBv.dpufJob Outlook 2015 Released


Minnesota Employers Added 6,100 Jobs in August

2014/09/30

State Gains 6,100 Jobs in August

Unemployment rate drops to 4.3 percent

September 18, 2014

Madeline Koch, 651-259-7236
Madeline.Koch@state.mn.us

ST. PAUL – Minnesota employers added 6,100 jobs in August, according to seasonally adjusted figures released today by the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED).

The August gains, combined with July figures that were revised from 4,200 jobs lost to 100 jobs lost, put calendar year gains at 13,200 jobs in the state. Over the past 12 months, the state has added 56,311 jobs, a 2 percent growth rate compared with a U.S. growth rate of 1.8 percent.

The state unemployment rate fell to 4.3 percent in August, the lowest unemployment rate in the state in nearly eight years. The U.S. unemployment rate in August was 6.1 percent.

“Our state has added nearly 203,000 jobs since hitting the low point of the recession in September 2009,” said DEED Commissioner Katie Clark Sieben. “The August employment figures are great news and a reflection of Minnesota’s healthy and growing economy.”

Construction and professional and business services were the strongest sectors in August, each adding 2,500 jobs. Other industries that added jobs were manufacturing (up 800), information (up 400), government (up 400), logging and mining (up 300), other services (up 300), trade, transportation and utilities (up 200), and education and health services (up 100).

Job losses were reported in August in financial activities (down 800) and leisure and hospitality (down 600).

Sectors that have gained jobs over the past 12 months are government (up 17,875), manufacturing (up 9,921), professional and business services (up 9,791), construction (up 7,446), education and health services (up 6,257), trade, transportation and utilities (up 4,360), leisure and hospitality (up 3,004), logging and mining (up 575) and information (up 540).

Two sectors lost jobs in the past year: financial activities (down 1,885) and other services (down 1,573).

In the Metropolitan Statistical Areas, the following regions gained jobs in the past 12 months: St. Cloud MSA (up 2.9 percent), Mankato MSA (up 2.6 percent), Minneapolis-St. Paul MSA (up 2.3 percent), Rochester MSA (up 0.9 percent) and Duluth-Superior MSA (up 0.7 percent).

DEED has added a section to its website that examines the unemployment rate by demographics (race, age and gender) and looks at alternative measures of unemployment. Click here for details.

DEED is the state’s principal economic development agency, promoting business recruitment, expansion and retention, workforce development, international trade and community development. For more details about the agency and our services, visit us at http://mn.gov/deed/ . Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/mndeed .State Gains 6,100 Jobs in August


8 Great Questions To Ask During A Job Interview

2014/06/24

Faced with one pointed question after another regarding your career, a job interview can quickly take on the feel of an interrogation.

But employers aren’t the only ones who get to poke and pry during the sit-down. At some point, job candidates can make inquiries that flesh out everything from expectations to why their prospective boss enjoys working for the company.

By asking thought-provoking questions, you can not only collect valuable information but also distinguish yourself from the pack.

“It means that you’re thoughtful about the process and that you’re very interested in the position because you took the time to think of questions that would be substantive,” says Cheryl Palmer, a career coach and founder of the career coaching firm Call to Career.

Here are some questions you can ask and tips for interpreting the responses from your interviewer.

1. How has this position evolved since it was created?

Getting a brief history on the role should clear up whether the position has expanded over the years or has been a dead end for employees, Palmer says.

Interpreting the response: If the interviewer says the position has expanded beyond its original scope (and is continuing to do so), that signifies an opportunity for growth within the company. If the position has stayed static for years, don’t expect to blossom there. Depending on your career ambitions, the latter response isn’t necessarily bad, Palmer says.

2. What have past employees done to succeed in this position?

Knowing how the organization measures achievements will help you understand what the expectations will be and whether you have the skill set to meet them, Palmer says. But don’t undermine your past accomplishments just because your route to success doesn’t match up with the one embraced by the company. “You also don’t want to be too narrowly defined by what other people have done. Because you’re a different person, you may approach things a little differently,” she says.

Interpreting the response: You may hear a description that highlights the positive and negative attributes of your predecessor. That could be a good indicator of the company’s culture. “Typically, what one person has done to be successful is what the organization tends to do to be successful,” Palmer says.

3. What have you enjoyed most about working here?

Your prospective boss can relay what he or she values most and what led to his or her personal success with the organization. Then, Palmer says, you can internally ruminate about whether you share the same values and can envision yourself working there.

Interpreting the response: Your interviewer may commend the company for everything from benefits to year-end bonuses. On the other hand, “if they’re struggling to come up with something positive about why they like working there, chances are good that you’re not going to be able to come up with anything positive after having worked there either,” Palmer says.

4. What is the top priority for the person in this position over the next three months?

This question is helpful so you know what to focus on if you do get the position, Palmer says. Without a clear expectation, she adds, you won’t know what to accomplish or how to make the right impression during your first days on the job.

Interpreting the response: You may be told that you need to complete 15 tasks rather than two or three. “If these are all big initiatives that they want you to handle, probably not that doable,” Palmer says.

5. What are the qualities of successful managers in this company?

If you’re interviewing for a managerial position, you’ll want knowledge of the skills and core competencies the company treasures in a leader, says David Lewis, founder and president of OperationsInc, a Connecticut-based human resources outsourcing and consulting firm. If excellent people skills and multitasking top the list, emphasize how you’ve demonstrated those traits throughout your career.

Interpreting the response: According to Lewis, you may get a response along these lines: “The best managers in our organization are independent thinkers, are good teachers, and completely aligned with the direction the company is going in.” If he or she can’t name a single star in the managerial stable, that’s problematic and speaks to an organization short on progress and promotions, Lewis notes.

6. If offered the position, can you give me examples of ways I would collaborate with my manager?

As an entry-level staffer, you may want to work with management as a means to showcase your skills and move up. But there’s a distinction between simply taking orders and actively working with a superior who is grooming you for something better. “[Finding] out how an organization utilizes people at the staff level is key,” Lewis says. “Is it a dictatorial environment or a collaborative one?”

Interpreting the response: The employer may be short on examples or dismiss the notion of working with management altogether. Prod further, Lewis says, and find out why that it is. There may be a legitimate reason behind why the company doesn’t promote collaboration.

7. What are some challenges that will face the person filling this position?

You owe it to yourself to know what you’re up against. “It just gives you a reality check,” Palmer says. The drawbacks may differ depending on whether the position is managerial or entry-level. As a manager, you may oversee a department that runs on a shoestring budget. As a lower-level staffer, you may work odd hours or get stuck with assignments that lack substance.

Interpreting the response: The interviewer may point out the least offensive parts of the job. But if he or she denies any downside whatsoever, that should raise doubts about his or her credibility. “Any boss that tells you there are not challenges, they’re lying. It’s just that simple,” Palmer says.

8. Do you have any hesitations about my qualifications?

Asking a question like this lets the interviewer know that you’re secure enough to openly discuss your vulnerabilities. It also signals confidence and the ability to be coached, says John Kador, author of “301 Best Questions to Ask on Your Interview.” “Coachability is a hugely attractive attribute as far as interviewers are concerned,” he explains.

Interpreting the response: At your urging, the interviewer may voice concerns about a lack of training in certain areas or gaps in employment. Rather than gloss over your shortcomings, address them and put up a respectful and reasonable defense. “You may be able to come up with a satisfactory response, you may not,” Kador says. “But at least you have the chance.”

This article originally appeared at U.S. News & World Report. Copyright 2014. Follow U.S. News & World Report on Twitter.

Read more: http://money.usnews.com/money/careers/articles/2013/10/23/the-best-questions-to-ask-during-a-job-interview#ixzz35acCX6Ix


Just landed your first job out of college? Here are 7 tips to get your career off to a good start.

2014/05/30

al.com

Just landed your first job out of college? Here are 7 tips to get your career off to a good start

Michelle@MondayMemos By Michelle@MondayMemos 
Follow on Twitter
on May 19, 2014 at 7:30 AM

As the new kid on the block, it is important to give yourself an opportunity to absorb the culture and practices of your organization.

AL.com Commentary

  • About the writer
    Michelle Powell writes the Monday Memo column for the Alabama Media Group. She can be reached at mpowell@professionalmanner.com.
  • Read more
    See more by Michelle Powell
More opinion on AL.com

As a recent college graduate and young adult, embarking upon your first career-oriented job is really important to you. Proving that you are in fact a good fit for the organization you just joined is in the forefront of your mind.

Having worked with human resource managers and corporate executives looking to groom potential leaders in their company, I can tell you there are a few things you need to look out for. In addition to polishing your mannerisms, you can put your best foot forward with these tips:

Keep it neat. You’ve already heard that you should “dress for success.” Just make sure you know what that really means, particularly for your work environment. To dress below the expected standard can be considered a sign of disrespect. Standing out and demonstrating independence is to be commended as it relates to your work. In your dress, however, it is important to follow the company dress code. Above all, whatever you choose to wear, keep your clothing neat, clean and well fitted (not tight or baggy). Keeping it neat also extends to your work area. Keeping yourself and your space well-ordered inspires confidence and respect from others.

Color in the lines.  This is not to say that you cannot or should not think outside the box. It does mean, however, that you should not try to shortcut or usurp established processes or protocol. In most cases, creativity and innovative thinking is encouraged; changing things just for recognition or avoidance (of an undesirable task or person) is not.

Don’t keep score.  College testing, comparative rankings and interviews have made you competitive and ambitious – great! But the downside is that they have made you competitive and ambitious. You must now become a team player and develop collaborative skills. Those who played team sports may have an easier time applying these skills in the workplace.

Wait your turn.  “Wait” seems like a nasty word these days but having patience is an exercise in good etiquette as well as making timely advancements in your career.  Nothing ruins a reputation or relationship more than a lack of restraint. It can lead to unintended rude behavior, missteps, alienation and missed opportunities. Wait your turn means not to interrupt others while in conversation; wait to be recognized in a meeting before speaking; wait your turn at the microwave. In the matter of career pursuits, judiciously waiting your turn is really about recognizing when to step up to take on leadership roles and understanding when it is appropriate for you to be considered for advancement in your organization or field. I do not wish to oversimplify this subject.  The main point is to have realistic expectations and know what it takes to be deserving of the role you seek (e.g. experience and tenure, not just credentials or charm).

Speak up.  If you have questions, ask. It is true that in this information age, you are quite resourceful and self-sufficient. However, it is better to ask for clarity than to make assumptions. Don’t confuse taking action with taking initiative; it may backfire. If your habit is to act first and ask questions later, you may become a risk in the eyes of management.

Don’t make it personal. Emotional maturity is essential here. Working with multiple generations, personalities, communication styles and work habits, it is inevitable that you will experience moments of frustration. There will be times when your patience will be tested. A harsh critique, disregard or even a snub from a co-worker or superior in the organization requires that you rise above the emotional response. Remember to focus on desired outcomes and maintaining good relations.

Use professional language. The temptation may be strong once you feel comfortable; however, at no point should you use phone texting language or emoticons in business correspondence. Likewise, do not let your speaking vocabulary be less than professional (profanity, overuse of slang, etc.). While it is important to build relationships with coworkers and customers, don’t do it at the expense of appropriate language.

As the new kid on the block, it is important to give yourself an opportunity to absorb the culture and practices of your organization. Only then can you make meaningful contributions and improvements. Hopefully, these tips will help you along the way.

Do you have other suggestions? Let me know in the comments below.


Best Questions to Ask During A Job Interview

2014/05/14

Faced with one pointed question after the next regarding your career, a job interview can quickly take on the feel of an interrogation.

But employers aren’t the only ones who get to poke and pry during the sit-down. At some point, job candidates can make inquiries that flesh out everything from expectations to why their prospective boss enjoys working for the company. By asking thought-provoking questions, you can not only collect valuable information but also distinguish yourself from the pack.

“It means that you’re thoughtful about the process and that you’re very interested in the position because you took the time to think of questions that would be substantive,” says Cheryl Palmer, a career coach and founder of the career coaching firm Call to Career.

Here are some questions you can ask and tips for interpreting the responses from your interviewer.

1. How has this position evolved since it was created?

Getting a brief history on the role should clear up whether the position has expanded over the years or has been a dead end for employees, Palmer says.

Interpreting the response: If the interviewer says the position has expanded beyond its original scope (and is continuing to do so), that signifies an opportunity for growth within the company. If the position has stayed static for years, don’t expect to blossom there. Depending on your career ambitions, the latter response isn’t necessarily bad, Palmer says.

[Read: 9 Things to Put on Your Job Interview Checklist.]

2. What have past employees done to succeed in this position?

Knowing how the organization measures achievements will help you understand what the expectations will be and whether you have the skill set to meet them, Palmer says. But don’t undermine your past accomplishments just because your route to success doesn’t match up with the one embraced by the company. “You also don’t want to be too narrowly defined by what other people have done. Because you’re a different person, you may approach things a little differently,” she says.

Interpreting the response: You may hear a description that highlights the positive and negative attributes of your predecessor. That could be a good indicator of the company’s culture. “Typically, what one person has done to be successful is what the organization tends to do to be successful,” Palmer says.

3. What have you enjoyed most about working here?

Your prospective boss can relay what he or she values most and what led to his or her personal success with the organization. Then, Palmer says, you can internally ruminate about whether you share the same values and can envision yourself working there.

Interpreting the response: Your interviewer may commend the company for everything from benefits to year-end bonuses. On the other hand, “if they’re struggling to come up with something positive about why they like working there, chances are good that you’re not going to be able to come up with anything positive after having worked there either,” Palmer says.

[See: The ABCs of Interviewing.]

4. What is the top priority for the person in this position over the next three months?

This question is helpful so you know what to focus on if you do get the position, Palmer says. Without a clear expectation, she adds, you won’t know what to accomplish or how to make the right impression during your first days on the job.

Interpreting the response: You may be told that you need to complete 15 tasks rather than two or three. “If these are all big initiatives that they want you to handle, probably not that doable,” Palmer says.

5. What are the qualities of successful managers in this company?

If you’re interviewing for a managerial position, you’ll want knowledge of the skills and core competencies the company treasures in a leader, says David Lewis, founder and president of OperationsInc, a Connecticut-based human resources outsourcing and consulting firm. If excellent people skills and multitasking top the list, emphasize how you’ve demonstrated those traits throughout your career.

Interpreting the response: According to Lewis, you may get a response along these lines: “The best managers in our organization are independent thinkers, are good teachers and completely aligned with the direction the company is going in.” If he or she can’t name a single star in the managerial stable, that’s problematic and speaks to an organization short on progress and promotions, Lewis notes.

6. If offered the position, can you give me examples of ways I would collaborate with my manager?

As an entry-level staffer, you may want to work with management as a means to showcase your skills and move up. But there’s a distinction between simply taking orders and actively working with a superior who is grooming you for something better. “[Finding] out how an organization utilizes people at the staff level is key,” Lewis says. “Is it a dictatorial environment or a collaborative one?”

Interpreting the response: The employer may be short on examples or dismiss the notion of working with management altogether. Prod further, Lewis says, and find out why that it is. There may be a legitimate reason behind why the company doesn’t promote collaboration.

7. What are some challenges that will face the person filling this position?

You owe it to yourself to know what you’re up against. “It just gives you a reality check,” Palmer says. The drawbacks may differ depending on whether the position is managerial or entry-level. As a manager, you may oversee a department that runs on a shoestring budget. As a lower-level staffer, you may work odd hours or get stuck with assignments that lack substance.

Interpreting the response: The interviewer may point out the least offensive parts of the job. But if he or she denies any downside whatsoever, that should raise doubts about his or her credibility. “Any boss that tells you there are not challenges, they’re lying. It’s just that simple,” Palmer says.

8. Do you have any hesitations about my qualifications?

Asking a question like this lets the interviewer know that you’re secure enough to openly discuss your vulnerabilities. It also signals confidence and the ability to be coached, says John Kador, author of “301 Best Questions to Ask on Your Interview.” “Coachability is a hugely attractive attribute as far as interviewers are concerned,” he explains.

[Read: How to Talk About Your Weaknesses in a Job Interview.]

Interpreting the response: At your urging, the interviewer may voice concerns about a lack of training in certain areas or gaps in employment. Rather than gloss over your shortcomings, address them and put up a respectful and reasonable defense. “You may be able to come up with a satisfactory response, you may not,” Kador says. “But at least you have the chance.”

The Best Questions to Ask During a Job Interview


Kauffman Study: Weaker Entrepreneurship Spells Stronger Job Market

2014/04/25

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Helpful Resources and Reports

Kauffman Study: Weaker Entrepreneurship Spells Stronger Job Market – Scan No. 8940

The U.S. saw slightly fewer businesses created last year, but there’s a silver lining: the poorer numbers nationwide likely indicate that a stronger job market relieved some of the pressure on people to start companies out of necessity.

That’s among the takeaways from the latest Kauffman Index of Entrepreneurial Activity, an annual study from the Kauffman Foundation.
An average of 0.28 percent of adults nationwide, or 280 per 100,000, started new businesses each month in 2013. That was down from 300 per 100,000 adults nationwide, or 0.3 percent, the previous year. The 2013 entrepreneurial rate is a return to the pre-recessionary level of 2006, which is more in line with historic rates, the study says.

The Kauffman study also found that 78.2 percent of new entrepreneurs last year had not recently been fired from a job, 4 percentage points higher than at the end of the recession in 2009. While it’s not a flawless link, the study says this measure can suggest that the overall jobs market is improving and forcing fewer people to take the entrepreneurial leap.

Entrepreneurship rates decreased across all U.S. regions last year, with the highest entrepreneurial activity in the West and the lowest in the Midwest. (It’s important to note that the study looks at manufacturing, construction, trade, services, and “other” industries—not just the high-growth tech companies often associated with entrepreneurship.)
Here are a few other notable nuggets from the Kauffman report:
—Last year, the most entrepreneurial activity happened in Montana (a rate of 610 new business owners per 100,000 adults), Alaska (470 per 100,000 adults), South Dakota (410), California (400), and Colorado (380). The states with the lowest activity were Iowa (110 per 100,000 adults), Rhode Island (140), Indiana (160), Minnesota (160 per), Washington (170), and Wisconsin (170).
—Of the 15 largest metropolitan areas, San Francisco had the highest entrepreneurial activity rate last year (0.57 percent), and Philadelphia had the worst (0.18 percent). Among other large metros, New York’s rate last year was 0.32 percent, Dallas was 0.33 percent, Houston was 0.34 percent, Boston was 0.25 percent, Detroit was 0.28 percent, and Seattle was 0.22 percent.
—Over the past decade, the largest increase in entrepreneurial activity came from a surprising place: Delaware, which nearly doubled its rate from 0.15 percent to 0.28 percent. Other relatively large entrepreneurial boosts over the past 10 years occurred in Massachusetts (0.08 percent), Nevada (0.08 percent), Alabama (0.08 percent), Florida (0.07 percent), California (0.07 percent), and New York (0.07 percent). The largest decreases occurred in Oregon (-0.11 percent), Iowa (-0.10 percent), Minnesota (-0.08 percent), and Wisconsin (-0.08 percent).
Jeff Engel
4/9/14
http://www.xconomy.com/wisconsin/2014/04/09/kauffman-study-weaker-entrepreneurship-spells-stronger-job-market/


Career Connections Job Fair- March 26th!

2014/03/19

CC Landscape


Etiquette Tip of The Week: Rules of interviews and alcohol

2014/03/12

When it comes to interviews and alcohol, first thing’s first. If you don’t drink, don’t drink. In business, it is better not to have alcohol, because you want to keep a clear head. Never walk around an event with a glass of wine pretending.

Here are some of the rules of interviews and alcohol:
While waiting in a restaurant for your interviewer to arrive, do not order alcohol.

If the interviewer asks you if you would like an alcohol beverage, ask first, “Are you having one?” (In an interview meal, the interviewee orders first and the interviewer orders second.)
If the interviewer is not having alcohol, you do not have alcohol either.
If the interviewer is having alcohol, you may join him/her… or not.

If the interviewer is throwing back three and four alcohol beverages, do not join him/her. Stop after the first.
An interviewer downing multiple cocktails is a red flag. Remember, you are interviewing the company as much as they are interviewing you.

If you do order alcohol, get a glass or red or white wine. Only because I care, will I tell you not to order white zinfandel when out on business. It’s considered a little on the tacky side. If you want to keep the ball in the box in your fridge at home, that’s fine. I promise not to tell anyone.

Plenty of non-alcohol beverages behind the bar: pop/soda, soda water with a lime (looks like a cocktail), or cranberry juice. Again, better to keep a clear head in business.

The Etiquette Tip of the Week may be forwarded to others who really, really need it, pinned to billboards, taped to the water cooler, blogged, Tweeted or used to fill that last little hole in your newsletter. Giving credit to the Culture and Manners Institute at http://www.cultureandmanners.com/ is the polite thing to do.

The Culture and Manners Institute is all about respect. Therefore, your email address will not be sold, traded or gifted to other parties, as that would not be a polite thing to do.


Etiquette Tip of The Week: The Sweet Seat

2014/02/10

When you invite someone out to lunch, that means you are the host and you pick up the check. It also means you offer your guest the best seat. Which is the best seat?

The seat facing out into the dining room.
The seat with the best window view.
The seat that is away from the aisle traffic.
The seat that is the most comfortable. (In the case where one side of the table is a cushioned couch-like banquette and the other side is a hard wooden chair, offer your guest the cushy banquette.)

If you are the guest, wait until your host tells you where to sit and remain standing by your seat until your host takes his/her seat.


MN Job and Internship Fair--It's Not Too Late to Sign Up!

2014/02/05

Come to Career Services in Sanford Hall to sign up for the fair! Free bus transportation provided.


Etiquette Tip of The Week

2014/01/22

“What do I do with my other hand?” College and graduate students and people in business often ask me that in a dining tutorial. If you are having soup, what happens to that hand not holding the spoon?

You may put the other hand in your lap or rest your wrist or even your forearm on the edge of the table.

What about elbows? If you grew up being told, “Keep your elbows off the table,” there is an exception to that rule. (Sorry, Grandmas!)

When you are between courses and there is no food on the table, you may put your elbows on the table. Usually, you do that in those big banquet meals where there is a lot of background noise in the room and you lean forward on your elbows so you can converse with a person on the other side of the round 8-top or 10-top table.

You may not put your elbow on the table if the purpose is to prop up your tired head.


2014 MN Job & Internship Fair--Register Today!!

2014/01/10

When:  Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Where:  Minneapolis Convention Center

Over 150 employers from business, government and industry will meet with prospective candidates to discuss internships and full-time job opportunities.  Students can email their resumes to employers prior to the fair to request an interview.  To attend you MUST be registered with BSUCareers and pre-registered for the fair.  Come to Career Services-Sanford Hall 102 to sign up or download the registration form and mail it to our office: Job Fair 2014 Registration form.   NEW this year:  free bus transportation!  Space is limited-first come first serve.  There is a refundable deposit needed to reserve your spot on the bus.

REGISTRATION INFO:

Early Bird- Nov. 19- Jan. 17     $20

Regular- Jan. 21-Feb. 11            $25

Late- Feb. 12-18                            $30


Career Tip #1 for College Students

2013/09/25

Go to the Career Center on campus at least once a semester and then every month when you are a senior

Source: http://blog.timesunion.com/careers/50-career-tips-for-college-students/1512/


Etiquette Tip of the Week: Gastrointestinal turmoil for job candidates

2013/07/31

A group interview for a large financial firm was held at a posh restaurant. One of the interviewers handed the wine list to a candidate and said, “Order for the table.”

This test has caused gastrointestinal turmoil for countless job candidates, but the rules to acing it are simple:
1) Select a wine that is moderately priced. Do not pick the cheapest (which shows you might not have good taste) or the most expensive (which shows you might run up the expense account.)

2) Do not spout off about your wine expertise. This shows you are pretentious and trying to one-up others: an unpleasant character flaw in a co-worker or new report.

3) Do not shake it, if you can fake it. If you do not know the first thing about wine, present the wine list to the wine steward, discreetly point to a price point and say, “I would like something from this area.” The rest of the table need not know if you are referring to the Rhone Valley in France… or $42. Most wine stewards recognize this as code for, “I don’t know beans about wine, so please pick out something from this price point that will make me look good.”

If you are not a consumer of alcohol, it is perfectly acceptable to say, “I don’t drink alcohol, so I must pass this on to someone more qualified,” then hand the wine list to the person next to you or back to the interviewer. No further explanation is required.

You do not have to be interviewing for a large financial firm to be put in this situation — there are a number of occasions in business dining where it might come up. Stick to these rules and you will be fine.


Etiquette Tip of The Week

2013/07/22

Tip #1: Lemon is lovely in your iced, hot tea or other beverage. Lemon slices are garnishes — they are there to look pretty. Lemon wedges are to be squeezed. To keep a lemon wedge from squirting the person next to you, cup one hand over it while you squeeze, or poke it with the tines of your fork before you squeeze it.

Tip #2: Don’t be intimidated by a table full of silverware or flatware. Start with the utensils on the outside and work your way in towards the plate with each course. Your dessert fork and/or spoon will be above your dinner plate or served on the plate with the dessert.


Etiquette Tip of The Week- July 8-14th

2013/07/09

There are three styles of serving a meal:

1) Butler Style: food is portioned out for you and served, often in a pretty presentation (butler not required)
2) Buffet Style: food in set out on another table and you serve yourself, then return to your table
3) Banquet Style: platters or bowls of food are passed around the table and you serve yourself

One of the great ironies, is when you go to a large banquet, they usually serving “Butler Style,” not “Banquet Style.”

When should you begin eating?
1) At a banquet or any dining situation where you are sitting at a table with eight or fewer people, begin when everyone at your table has been served. (It is not necessary to wait for all 200 people in the banquet hall to be served.) If there are nine or more people at the table, wait until at least a few people have been served to begin.
2) In an interview meal or dinner party, follow your host’s lead and begin eating when your host begins.

3) With a buffet, you may begin eating as soon as you are seated, but it is polite to wait until at least a few people have joined you. You never want to look like you are half-starved at a business meal.

No matter what style, remember to sit up straight and bring the food up to you.


11 Reasons Why You Will Never Be Hired

2013/07/01

http://www.slideshare.net/markrotoole/congratulations-graduate-eleven-reasons-why-i-will-never-hire-you


Etiquette tip of The Week:Follow through with the I Do...

2013/06/12

If you are offered a job and you accept, follow up a verbal agreement with a letter of acceptance that shows your enthusiasm.  If you decide not to take an offer, send a letter of regret.

Culture and Manners Institute