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Green Building

"The green building movement needs to rethink its focus on fitting ever more energy-saving devices into increasingly goofy buildings. Architecture that instead taps into public tastes for tradition, familiarity and comfort will give us places that create their own natural preservation societies, because they are loved. Reusing old buildings is the true green architecture. Buildings designed for decades must give way to buildings designed for centuries."  - Providence Journal

Laurel House

The Laurel House is currently unoccupied and in need of renovation. It was purchased by the BSU Foundation and was leased by BSU as a residence for students in the Honors Program. When renovation is completed the house will be a living quarters that demonstrates reduced utility house usage. The project will show the community how to obtain affordable green practices that reduce that impact on the environment and how easy it is for them to get similar things in their homes. Some examples of what the house will entail:
  • Energy Efficient Windows (u-factor less than 0.24)
  • Water Conserving Technologies (toilets, faucets, and shower heads that conserve water. Rain barrels that catch rain water for irrigation)
  • Resource Efficient Landscaping (vegetation that requires little water or maintenance, water permeable hard surfaces, rain garden to reduce runoff)
  • Local Resources (use of materials that are local, to reduce transportation and help local economies)
  • Low or No VOCs (use of paint, flooring, and other finishes that emit no or minimal VOCs)

Memorial Hall

Memorial Hall will be renovated in the upcoming year, and BSU is excited that it will its first Sliver LEED Certified building by the U.S. Green Building Council! LEED stands for Leadership in Energy Efficiency and Design.

"Will you teach your children what we have taught our children? That the Earth is our Mother? What befalls the Earth befalls all the sons of the Earth."
~ Chief Seattle in a letter to President Franklin Pierce, 1852