Student Learning Outcomes

Indigenous Sustainability Studies MAJOR

Students will be able to:

  • Define key terms of the time such as: treaties, colonization, sovereignty, Anishinaabe, environmental justice, 7th Generation, sustainability, climate change, biodiversity, natural cycles, and ecosystems.
  • Compare the holistic (physical, mental, spiritual and emotional) ways that Indigenous people consider or interact with the environment with the evidence-based (linear, objective, and measurable) way that Western scientists consider the environment.
  • Explain the basic structure and function of natural ecosystems and global cycles, and discuss how they relate to a sustainable community from the Western science and Indigenous perspectives.
  • Examine differences between Indigenous environmental knowledge and Western science today and discuss challenges that arise from these differences.
  • Propose and assess alternative solutions to local and global environmental problems from both an Indigenous and Western science lens.
  • Be able to discuss the balanced spiritual-cultural foundation of the original people of the Americas via Creation stories and Indigenous Natural Laws.
  • Be able to analyze their own attitude, behaviors, and beliefs regarding humans’ responsibility to the Earth.
  • Understand institutional racism and oppression found in tribal and public education and analyze their impact.
  • Cultivate skillful means of communication and mindful inquiry through educational awareness, listening, patience and action.

 

Indigenous Sustainability Studies MINOR

Students will be able to:

  • Compare the holistic (physical, mental, spiritual and emotional) ways that Indigenous people consider or interact with the environment with the evidence-based (linear, objective, and measurable) way that Western scientists consider the environment.
  • Examine differences between Indigenous environmental knowledge and Western science today and discuss challenges that arise from these differences.
  • Propose and assess alternative solutions to local and global environmental problems from both an Indigenous and Western science lens.
  • Be able to analyze their own attitude, behaviors, and beliefs regarding humans’ responsibility to the Earth.
  • Cultivate skillful means of communication and mindful inquiry through educational awareness, listening, patience and action.