DRAFT


Bemidji State University-HLC

2010 Reaccreditation Self-Study Report





Date: October 16, 2009

To: Campus

From: HLC Writing Team

Elizabeth Dunn, HLC Co-chair (Interim Dean, College of Arts & Sciences)

Marty Wolf, HLC Faculty Co-chair (Math & Computer Science Department)

Susan Hauser, Writer (English Department)

Subject: HLC Self-Study Draft


Attached is a draft of Bemidji State’s 2010 HLC self-study document. The team invites you to comment freely on the content and to provide supporting information, especially regarding notes that are shaded in gray.


The Writing Team thanks the five criterion committees for their ongoing work. They are providing content and evidence for the document and are commenting on drafts. To view their work, visit the self-study web site <http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/> and click on Committees in the left column. Other information about our self-study process is also available on this site.


Please send your comments to Marty Wolf (mwolf, # 23, 2825). We would like them by November 6 so that we may consider them as we complete the document. Questions may also be addressed to Marty.


Self-Study Deadlines

Due Dates

Actions

10/16/09

Draft to campus.

11/06/09

Comments due to writing team.

12/01/09

Completed copy to Production Office.

01/22/10

Self-study due at HLC offices.

02/15/10

Mock visit.

03/22-24/10

HLC team campus visit.


DRAFT—Table of Contents

Bemidji State University-HLC 2010 Reaccreditation Self-Study Report



Criterion One

Introduction

  1. Primary Mission Documents (1a, 1b)

  2. Foundational Mission Documents (1a, 1c)

  3. Mission Integrity (1b, 1c, 1d, 1e)

  4. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence


Criterion Two

Introduction

  1. Consistent Mission, Refined Identity (Core Components 2a, 2d)

  2. Societal and Economic Trends (Core Component 2a)

  3. Planning Documents (Core Components 2a, 2d)

  4. Planning Processes (Core Components 2a, 2d)

  5. Resource Base (Core Components 2b, 2d)

  6. Assessment Systems (Core Components 2b, 2c)

  7. Funding Follows Planning: Closing the Loop (Core Components 2a, 2d)

  8. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence


Criterion Three

Introduction

1. Learning and Teaching: University-level Planning, Support, Excellence (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3d)

2. Learning & Teaching Environments: Undergraduate (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)

3. Learning & Teaching Environments: Graduate (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)

4. Learning & Teaching Environments: External (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)

5. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence

Chapter Four

Introduction

  1. University Commitment (4a, 4c, 4d)

  2. Faculty and staff (4a, 4c)

  3. The Learning Journey: Student Development and Enrollment (4b, 4c, 4d)

  4. Liberal Education (4b, 4c, 4d)

  5. Undergraduate Study (4a, 4b, 4c)

  6. Graduate Study (4a, 4b, 4c)

  7. External Communities of Interest (4b)

  8. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence


Criterion Five

Criterion Five is organized according to the University Plan 2008-2013 Strategy B

Strategic Imperative B: Support and promote community vitality through Bemidji State’s commitments within our local, regional, national and world spheres. Value Statement: Bemidji State values the supportive relationships between the university and its communities.


Introduction

  1. University-wide Commitment to External Communities of Interest (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  2. University Plan Strategy B.1. Support and promote educational vitality (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  3. University Plan Strategy B.2 Support and promote economic vitality and quality of place (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  4. University Plan Strategy B.3 Support and promote cultural and recreational vitality (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  5. University Plan Strategy B.4 Promote environmental vitality (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  6. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence

DRAFT—Chapter One, Criterion One

Bemidji State University-HLC 2010 Reaccreditation Self-Study Report


Below is a draft of Criterion One of Bemidji State’s 2010 HLC self-study document. The self-study writing team invites you to comment freely on the content and to provide information regarding notes that are shaded in gray.


The writing team thanks the five criterion committees for their ongoing work. They are providing content and evidence for the document and are commenting on drafts. To view their work, visit the self-study web site <http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/> and click on Committees in the left column. Other information about our self-study process is also available on this site.


Please send your comments to Marty Wolf (mwolf, # 23, 2825). We would like them by November 6 so that we may consider them as we complete the document. Questions may also be addressed to Marty.


Self-Study Deadlines

Due Dates

Actions

10/16/09

Draft to campus.

11/06/09

Comments due to writing team.

12/01/09

Completed copy to Production Office.

01/22/10

Self-study due at HLC offices.

02/15/10

Mock visit.

03/22-24/10

HLC team campus visit.


READING & COMMENTING ON THE 10/16/2009 DRAFT

On weird things in the text:

Regarding your comments:

Regarding previous Criterion Committee comments:

Regarding the Core Components


HLC Writing Team

Elizabeth Dunn, HLC Co-chair (Interim Dean, College of Arts & Sciences)

Marty Wolf, HLC Faculty Co-chair (Math & Computer Science Department)

Susan Hauser, Writer (English Department)


Shaping Potential/Shaping Worlds

Story here...


Criterion One: Mission and Integrity

The organization operates with integrity to ensure the fulfillment of its mission through structures and processes that involve the board, administration, faculty, staff, and students.



Organization of Criterion One

Introduction

1. Primary Mission Documents (1a, 1b)

2. Foundational Mission Documents (1a, 1c)

3. Mission Integrity (1b, 1c, 1d, 1e)

4. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence


Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.


XX

Higher education “is an enterprise in which qualified professionals first determine what students should know and be able to do as a result of their education and then create processes to determine that students actually know and can do these things. It also seeks to equip people to be self-motivated and self-sustaining learners throughout their lives. It is to fulfill this very critical set of goals that colleges and universities create structures to enable their achievement.” Higher Learning Commission-The Handbook of Accreditation (3.2, Core Component 1d)


Foundational Mission Documents

Values and actions of Bemidji State University originate in academic departments. These values and actions are coordinated and framed by college plans which, in turn, inform the Master Academic Plan (MAP). The MAP informs other master plans.


Primary Mission Document

The University Plan is coordinated and framed by its Foundational Mission Documents.


Academic Programs

|

Colleges

|

Master Academic Plan

| |-->Other Master

Plans

University Plan


Introduction

In its mission documents, Bemidji State University clearly and consistently articulates its mission, including core values, goals, and commitments to internal and external constituents. The documents identify processes for accomplishing the mission in fair and balanced ways; embrace complex and broad notions of diversity; provide for academic quality and continuous improvement; accommodate innovative response to unanticipated change; and encourage collaborative decision-making. Further, the university’s mission is evident in strategic documents at all levels, including master, college and department plans and administrative and student services plans. It is also manifest in the actions of the university from its academic programs to its physical plant. Mission documents are readily available to the public.

DD

Availability of Primary Mission Documents

  • The University Plan 2008-2013 is readily available on the university’s web site under About BSU, Strategic Directions, the usual placement of such documents on higher education sites.

  • The university’s vision, mission and signature themes, which are included in the University Plan, are additionally highlighted under Strategic Directions.

  • The documents are also available through links on the Administration, Office of the President and Office of Academic Affairs pages.

  • A University Plan booklet is available from the Office of the President.


Foundational Mission Documents & Availability

These documents are available online.

Academic

Facilities ~

Student Development & Enrollment~

Technology~

  • College Vision and Mission Statements

Arts & Sciences

Business, Technology & Communication

Health Sciences & Human Ecology


DD

Core Component 1a: The organization’s mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization’s commitments.


Core Component 1b: In its mission documents, the organization recognizes the diversity of its learners, other constituencies, and the greater society it serves.



YY

Bemidji State Internal Constituents Include:

  • Current students

  • Faculty and staff

  • Departments and units within the university


Bemidji State External Constituents Include:

  • Potential students

  • Alumni

  • Businesses

  • Organizations

  • University Foundation

  • Other MnSCU schools

  • P-12 area schools

  • Governmental units

  • Minnesota State Legislature

  • Accrediting bodies

  • Granting agencies

  • Local, regional and state governments and communities

  • American Indian governments, communities and schools


AA

Evaluation and Revision Schedule for Primary and Foundational Mission Documents

  • 2008-2013 Annual Work Plans for University Plan

  • 2008-2013 Ongoing Development of Master Plans

  • 2010 HLC Self-study

  • 2014: University Plan

  • 2020 HLC Self-study

1. Primary Mission Document: The University Plan

(Core Components 1a, 1b)


DD

The 2008-2013 University Plan defines Bemidji State’s mission and provides guidance for decision-making. Reflecting the complexity of the university’s overall mission, the University Plan has five congruent components:

  • Vision

  • Mission

  • Signature themes (values)

  • SCOT analysis

  • Strategies


The evolution of the current University Plan and its elements are discussed and documented in Chapter Two. Criterion Two Preparing for the Future, especially in 1. Consistency of Mission, Refinement of Identity and 3. Planning Documents.

Vision

Shaping Potential, Shaping Worlds: Bemidji State University is a catalyst for shaping the potential of those it serves, who in turn, shape the worlds in which they live and work.


The vision statement articulates the university’s understanding that it operates in a vast arena, from the personal and imaginative world of individuals to the greater world in a global sense. The statement also articulates the understanding that university study changes the lives of individuals and, in turn, they change the worlds they live in. The term “world” is intentional in the statement: it is manifold in meaning and application, as is the potential of the university educated citizen and of human endeavor.


Vision, Mission or Mission, Vision?

Traditionally, Bemidji State has placed its vision statement first in its documents, followed by its mission statement. The practice is continued in this document. At Bemidji State, the vision is taken as a larger perspective that encircles the mission, thus preceding it.


Mission

Engage. Embrace. Educate.

As northern Minnesota's university, we engage in new worlds of thought, embrace responsible citizenship, and educate for a future that can only be imagined.


The university’s mission statement identifies the actions that carry out values expressed in the vision. It explains the ways in which the university shapes individuals and thus shapes worlds: we engage students in thinking and creativity; we embrace notions of responsible citizenship, from the personal world to the global world; and we educate students for thinking toward the future—a collective act of the imagination. The use of verbs in the mission statement is intentional: we are a university of action.


Signature Themes

Students, through the sum of their educational experience at Bemidji State, will have multiple opportunities to learn about, experience, and reflect on the university's Signature Themes. The themes represent core values that guide curriculum and services. Not tightly defined, they invite interpretation and discovery.

  • International/multicultural understanding

  • Civic engagement

  • Environmental stewardship


The Signature Themes articulate values that focus the vision and mission. Bemidji State values the fathoming of diversity; it values actions by individuals who shape the worlds they inhabit and for which they are responsible; it values the Earth we live on and accepts responsibility for its health and well-being.


These values fire the imagination and lead to action that can be measured. They are the passion that fuels change, that shapes potential and worlds.


SCOT Analysis: Internal Strengths, Internal Challenges; External Opportunities, External Threats

In the context of its vision and mission, the SCOT analysis scans the internal and external environments in which Bemidji State operates. Some items are oxymoronic: both favorable and unfavorable, blessing and curse. For example, “University Planning” appears under Internal Strengths and Internal Challenges, as does “Information and Support Technology.” “Service to Student Populations” appears under External Opportunities; “The Changing Societal Landscape of Northern Minnesota,” i.e., student demographics, appears under External Threats.


University planning, both a strength and a challenge, is, as it should be, a work in progress, as is information and support technology. The changing societal landscape of Northern Minnesota, which includes the movement of our student base away from the region, is ameliorated by the potential of a broadened, worldwide student base made available to Bemidji State as students here and abroad come to see the world as their home.



Goals & Institutional Priorities: Strategies for 2008-2013

YY, AA

The Strategies for 2008-2013~ complete the University Plan. The evolution of the strategies, as well as the other components of the plan, is discussed in Chapter Two Preparing for the Future, 3. Planning Documents.


The plan has four strategies. Each is followed by a Strategic Imperative that gives direction to the strategy and a value statement (in italic) that identifies the values that inform the strategy.


Strategy A: Engage Students for Success in Careers, Communities and Life

Strategic Imperative: Create opportunities for student success through high quality programs and services. Bemidji State recognizes the value of higher education as a public good, provides student-centered access to learning, meets the needs of our diverse, rural and nontraditional students, and promotes lifelong learning.


Strategy B: Promote Vital Communities through Involvement

Strategic Imperative: Support and promote community vitality through Bemidji State’s commitments within our local, regional, national and world spheres. Bemidji State values the supportive relationships between the university and its communities.


Strategy C: Innovate for a Changing World

Strategic Imperative: Accommodate change through an organizational culture of creativity, innovation and planning. Bemidji State values flexibility and adaptability as means to change.

Strategy D: Optimize Resources to Achieve the University’s Vision and Mission

Strategic Imperative: Effectively manage and increase enrollment and resources in support of the university’s vision and mission. Bemidji State recognizes and honors the role of the university in the stewardship of its resources and the importance of accountability.


Each strategy also contains a Goals and Measurements component. As noted in the plan, “Goals and Measurements evaluate achievement of the University Plan and of related items in MnSCU’s Strategic Plan. They are numbered consecutively throughout the Plan.”


The strategies are implemented through initiatives. As noted in the plan, the initiatives “are accounted for in Annual Work Plans and Work Plan Reports.”


Evidence of the mission documents permeating university structures and actions follows in 3. Mission Integrity.



FF

Core Component 1a: The organization’s mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization’s commitments.


Core Component 1c: Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization.

2. Foundational Mission Documents

(Core Components 1a,1c)

FF

The five components of the University Plan comprise the primary mission documents of Bemidji State. Those documents are supported through the foundational mission plans:

  • Master Plans

  • College and Department Plans

  • Administrative and Student Services Department Plans


The relationship of these documents to the University Plan, and especially to the Strategies for 2008-2013, is discussed and documented in Chapter Two~. That discussion provides evidence that the foundational master, college and department plans give shape and meaning to the University Plan.


Mission evolves at the foundational level. Mission integrity is promoted when the stated mission is congruent with foundational actions.




GG

Core Component 1b: In its mission documents, the organization recognizes the diversity of its learners, other constituencies, and the greater society it serves.


Core Component 1c: Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization.


Core Component 1d: The organization’s governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission.


Core Component 1e: The organization upholds and protects its integrity.








HH

Recruitment Plan

Bemidji State University and its affiliate, Northwest Technical College, seek highly qualified applicants for vacancies and new positions through effective advertising accessible to all Job Groups.” Chapter 11 2008-2010 Affirmative Action Plan University and College





JJ

Bargaining Units

at Bemidji State

IFO: Inter Faculty Organization; BSUFA: Bemidji State University Faculty Association, IFO Local.


AFSCME: American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees Council 6, Local 1949



Classified Managerial, Minnesota Department of Employee Relations



MAPE: Minnesota Association of Professional Employees



MNA: Minnesota Nurses Association



Commissioner’s Plan: Non-managerial Unrepresented Employees, Minnesota Department of Employee Relations



MMA: Middle Management Association, Minnesota Department of Employee Relations



MSUAASF: Minnesota State University Association of Administrative & Service Faculty





JJ1

Dimensions of Student Learning

Dimension 1: Intellectual Development

Outcomes:

  • Higher Order Thinking

  • Knowledge, Values, and Abilities Related to the Arts, Humanities, Sciences, and Specialized Fields of Study


Dimension 2: Understanding of Self and Relating to Others

Outcomes:

  • Values

  • Communication

  • Human Diversity

  • Self Development


Dimension 3: Participation in an Emerging Global Society

Outcomes:

  • Readiness for Careers

  • Responsible Citizenship




3. Mission Integrity

(Core Components 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e)

As noted above, mission permeates planning at Bemidji State: it is consistently articulated and referenced in its primary and foundational mission documents. Proof that mission permeates the organization lies in the application of the mission to everyday operations.


The following examples are offered as evidence that mission permeates both the letter and the spirit of Bemidji State’s actions. The proofs are organized according to the three promises of the mission statement: Engage, Embrace, Educate. These sections additionally recognize two major constituencies, internal (current students, faculty and staff, departments and units with the university) and external (potential students, Bemidji State University Foundation, other schools, businesses, government and other agencies). Within those sections, attention is especially drawn to the university’s signature themes and to ways in which the university honors broad concepts of diversity.


GG

E1 Engage in new worlds of thought

(Core Components 1b, 1c)

New worlds of thought” is a relative concept. For traditional freshmen, it might mean an introduction to the philosophy of Plato. For a graduate student it might mean the integration of learning into a focused, innovative thesis. For a faculty member it might mean new knowledge generated through scientific research or the creation of a work of art. For the university it might mean diversity in academic programming. For a business in Bemidji it might mean ongoing education for employees.


LEVEL C Internal Constituents

Bemidji State’s promise to “engage in new worlds of thought” is evidenced in faculty, staff and administration credentials and professional development, and in curriculum, program and assessment planning and processes.


LEVEL D Qualified Faculty, Staff, and Administration: Bemidji State assures that its faculty, staff and administration have preparation and credentials relevant to its mission. This is accomplished primarily through two processes: hiring and professional development.


HH

LEVEL EHiring Processes: Hiring processes at Bemidji State reflect the university’s mission, including diversity interests. Appropriate credentials are required for all positions. A protocol for writing and advertising job descriptions and for search committees is utilized~. The protocol requires that position descriptions include the university’s mission statement and signature themes and an affirmative action statement. Search committee membership is subject to affirmative action policy.


Career Opportunities at Bemidji State University are advertised on the university’s web site <http://www.bemidjistate.edu/offices/human_resources/employment/> and as noted in the 2008-2010 Affirmative Action Plan University and College, Chapter 11 Recruitment Plan. The university participates in the Upper Midwest Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC).


Affirmative action documents, including nondiscrimination and reasonable accommodation policies, and a complaint procedures flowchart are available online. <http://www.bemidjistate.edu/offices/affirmative_action/>


LEVEL EProfessional Development: Professional development processes are in place for faculty, staff and administration.


JJ

For faculty, the process is defined in and regulated by the Inter Faculty Organization/MnSCU Master Agreement. It requires regular professional development plans and reports based on five criteria:

I. Demonstrated ability to teach effectively or perform effectively in other current assignments.

II. Scholarly or creative achievement or research

III. Evidence of continuing preparation and study

IV. Contribution to Student Growth and Development

V. Service to the University and Community

((Include link to PDP schedule from AVP’s office))


The plans and reports are commented on by department faculty and chairs and are commented on and used by deans and the academic vice president to advise faculty members on appropriate professional development. The documents also contribute to decisions on faculty promotion and tenure. The IFO/MnSCU Master Agreement addresses professional development evaluation in Appendix G.


Directors and staff of the Office of Student Development and Enrollment are also evaluated on a regular basis as noted in the Student and University Services Program Planning and Review Resource Manual.


Complementing annual staff review, the strategic plan for the Office of Student Development and Enrollment, the J-Plan, provides for professional staff development:


J-Plan Strategies to Achieve the Mission

6. Promote and support staff professional development. Hallmarks of a strong, unified and successful staff include collaboration and collegiality; scholarship, participation in conferences and knowledge of professional literature; the framing of work in a common language of learning; and the modeling of learning and growth.


The Human Resources Office contributes to professional development by offering seminars for Student Development and Enrollment staff, such as the following:

  • 2000 We Are the Key: Keys to success in personal life as well as professional.

  • 2002 Catch and Release the Energy: Feel good about your job, yourself. Personal wellness, stress management, pride in doing a good job.

  • 2004 A Winning Balance: Diversity.

  • 2006 Surviving and Thriving: Change.

  • 2009 Performance Management: Focus on Development, March 2009, for Supervisors

  • 2009 Engaging Conversations, for Supervisors


Deans develop annual plans and goals, submit annual reports, attend professional seminars, and are evaluated by faculty through a formal process. Faculty evaluations are shared with other deans and contribute to further goal development.


Vice Presidents and the President of the university are evaluated annually according to processes established by Human Resources, Office of the Chancellor, MnSCU System http://www.oochr.mnscu.edu/index.html

. In addition, the vice presidents and deans establish mission-relevant goals for their offices for the academic year and report annually on progress made. Vice presidents and deans also meet annually with their supervisors and are evaluated annually by the faculty. The evaluations are reviewed in the Deans’ Council.((Okay to say that?))


LEVEL DCurriculum Integrity and Vitality: The university’s curriculum processes and documents support Bemidji State’s mission to “Engage in new worlds of thought.” Assessment systems are also in place to further assure the integrity of the mission. These are discussed in Chapter Two~.


JJ1

The Dimensions of Student Learning, instituted in the 1995 University Assessment Plan, state learning outcomes that students are expected to attain by graduation. They are listed in the MAP (Master Academic Plan) and the J-Plan (The Learning Journey, Student Development and Enrollment Master Plan) and are referenced in the Master Facility Plan. Academic Department five-year assessment plans are based on the Dimensions of Student Learning~. The dimensions, including further description and examples of objectives, are included in Guidelines: Five-Year Academic Program Planning and Review Cycle, April 2008.


The dimensions roughly approximate the three points of the university’s mission and signature themes and thus contribute to mission continuity:


Dimension 1 Intellectual Development

  • Mission: Engage in new worlds of thought

  • Signature Theme: International/multicultural understanding

Dimension 2 Understanding of Self and Relating to Others

  • Mission: Embrace responsible citizenship

  • Signature Theme: Educate for a future that can only be imagined

Dimension 3 Participation in an Emerging Global Society

  • Mission: Civic engagement

  • Signature Theme: Environmental stewardship


Integrity of mission is further supported by the university’s internal curriculum development and approval process. (New programs are also approved at the state level.) The process provides evidence that curriculum is developed in a cooperative atmosphere, a sharing of leadership and authority that promotes and models the university’s mission.

As designated in the Curriculum Proposal Approval Process proposals move through the following stages:

  • Faculty member (originator) and/or department chair/program coordinator (originator) (in consultation with Curriculum Liaison~, as appropriate)

  • Department, for approval

  • Dean, for approval, in consultation with Academic Affairs Vice President

  • Academic Affairs, for tracking

  • Curriculum Coordinator, for tracking

  • Curriculum Committee, and Teacher Education, Graduate and Liberal Education Committees, as appropriate, for approval

  • Faculty Senate, for approval

  • Vice President for Academic Affairs, for approval


Curriculum proposals are logged into a web-based document so their progress through the process can be readily ascertained. This feature is new since the 2000 self-study and was developed in response to concerns about fair notice to the campus regarding proposals and about faculty and department ability to track proposals.


LEVEL DProgram Diversity, Vitality, Accreditation: In addition to its programs in the arts and sciences, Bemidji State offers select professional programs that support the university’s mission by providing students with vibrant study and career options. By way of example:


Mission integrity is also evidenced in Bemidji’s program accreditations:


LEVEL DSignature Theme—International/multicultural understanding: While the three signature themes cut across the three mission elements, International/multicultural understanding is as an especially natural fit for “Engage in new worlds of thought.” Numerous programs at Bemidji State engage students in awareness of diverse cultures, opinions, fields of study, career opportunities and other worlds that might be utterly new to them or that they might have deemed to be out of their own reach. The following programs especially address international / multicultural understanding and are evidence that Bemidji State broadly acknowledges the concept of diversity, understands that it extends beyond race and gender, and embraces varied interpretations of human experiences and values.


LEVEL EAcademic Programs: While most programs at Bemidji State teach and model diversity in their curricula, some programs are especially designed to broaden students’ awareness and understanding of diversity. These include the following:


LEVEL EStudent Support Services: The university also recognizes the diverse needs of its student body and addresses those needs through student services, including the following:


LEVEL EStudent Organizations: In general, student organizations reflect the diverse interests of the university’s student body. In addition, some serve specific student groups, promote certain cultures or address diversity issues. These include the following organizations:

  • American Indian Science and Engineering Society

  • Council of Indian Students

  • German Club

  • Habitat for Humanity

  • International Student Organization

  • Lifestyle Educators

  • Phoenix of BSU

  • Social Work Club

  • Spanish Club

  • Students for the Environment

  • Students Today Leaders Forever

  • Women’s Club Hockey

  • Women’s Rugby


LEVEL CExternal Constituents

Bemidji State fully appreciates its role as an institution of higher learning in its local, regional, national and international communities. These relationships are discussed in Chapter Five.~


LEVEL DUniversity Plan: In its strategic plan, one of four strategies is wholly devoted to these relationships: Strategy B, Promote Vital Communities through Involvement~. Initiatives within the plan address those that support the mission component “Engage in new worlds of thought,” including the following:

  • B.1 Support and promote educational vitality.

  • B.3 Support and promote cultural and recreational vitality.


LEVEL DOfferings: Examples of university offerings that especially accommodate the promise to “engage in new worlds of thought” include the following:

    • Concurrent high school enrollment

    • Campus enrollment

  • Art exhibits

  • Music performances

  • Theatrical performances

  • Literary publications


KK

Core Component 1b: In its mission documents, the organization recognizes the diversity of its learners, other constituencies, and the greater society it serves.


Core Component 1c: Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization.


Core Component 1d: The organization’s governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission.


Core Component 1e: The organization upholds and protects its integrity.


LL

MnSCU Policies and Practices include the following:

  • Policy 1B.1 Nondiscrimination in Employment and Education Opportunity

  • Policy 1B.1.1 Report/Complaint of Discrimination/Harassment Investigation Resolution

  • Policy 1B.2 Affirmative Action in Employment

  • Policy 1B.3.1 Sexual Violence Policy

  • Policy 1B.4 Access for Individuals with Disabilities

  • Procedure 1C.0.1 Employee Code of Conduct

  • Procedure 5.22.1 Acceptable Use of Computers and Information Technology

  • Policy 3.6 Student Conduct

  • Procedure 3.6.1 Student Conduct


LL2

Bemidji State University Student Handbook

Policies & Procedures

  • Academic Policies

  • Academic Integrity Policies

  • Campus Policies

  • Discrimination, Harassment and Sexual Violence Policies

  • Financial Aid Policies

  • Other Policies


Student Code of Conduct

  • Section I: Preamble

  • Section II: Code of Conduct

  • Section III: Sanctions for Violations

  • Section IV: Conduct System

  • Off Campus Conduct

  • Health Review



Right to Know

  • Alcohol and Other Drugs

  • Annual Security Report

  • Privacy of Education Records

  • Student Right to Know Act of 1999

  • Victims Bill of Rights


SPA Committee

Charge:





Code of Conduct Training: MnSCU employees participated in online training FY 2009.









NN ADD DATA

Bemidji State Demographics

  • American Indian

  • International

  • Local/regional/state

  • Women





MM

Request to Use Facilities








PP

Student Organizations especially committed to civic engagement:

  • Association of Accounting Professionals/Accounting Club

  • Council of Indian Students

  • Habitat for Humanity

  • Hobson Union Programming Board

  • Lifestyle Educators

  • Oak Hall Council

  • Phoenix of Bemidji State University

  • Relay for Life

  • Spanish Club

  • Student Nurses Association

  • Students Today Leaders Forever (STLF) (Pay it Forward)

  • Veterans Club



RR2

MnSCU Procedure 5.11.1 Tuition and Fees, Part 2: Before any increase is made in the fee maximums, the Office of the Chancellor shall consult with the statewide student associations.

KK

E2 Embrace Responsible Citizenship

(Core Components 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e)


The notion of responsible citizenship is bred into Bemidji State. The university was formed in 1919 as Bemidji Normal School when the citizens of the region implored the state to help them provide licensed teachers for their ever-growing student population. Today the notion of civic responsibility is more complex and far-reaching than it was early in the last century and even early in this century. Bemidji State models responsible citizenship, guides students and faculty in civic engagement opportunities, serves diverse populations and cultures and maintains significant relationships with external constituencies.


LEVEL C Internal Constituents

Bemidji State’s promise to “embrace responsible citizenship” is evidenced in its collaborative decision-making, policies and practices, its recognition of and service to diverse populations and cultures, and in its “Civic Engagement” signature theme.


LEVEL DCollaboration, Consultation, Communication: Bemidji State benefits from and models decision-making informed by campus collaborations and consultations, and by open communication strategies. This approach was recommended as a “robust strategy” in the final report of the 2007 Scenario Planning Committee:~ “Focus on improved campus culture: communications, empowerment, civility.” The recommendation is included in the 2008-2013 University Plan:

Strategy C: Innovate for a Changing World

C.1 Increase organizational capacity for a successful, compelling and collegial campus culture. Improve the success of the university through increased communication, and support for collaboration.~


In addition to the 2005-2007 Scenario Planning Committee~, recent ad hoc collaborations include the 2007 Reorganization Work Group~ and the Liberal Education Task Force~. Ongoing consultation occurs at Academic Forums for Vice Presidents, Deans and Department Chairs~.


Ongoing communication strategies include regular Meet and Confer sessions with bargaining units~; frequent Budget Forums; topical campus conversations~; regular newsletters and online news postings; and administrative meetings and retreats with vice presidents and directors.

These collaborations, consultations and communication help inform university planning and action. By way of example, the outcomes of collaboration, consultation and communication strategies for the 2008-2103 University Plan are discussed in Chapter Two, Criterion Two.~ ((LINK TO 1. Planning Documents, Level I Documents, University Plan, Strategies for 2008-2103.))


LL

LEVEL DPolicies and Practices: Bemidji State, in compliance with federal, state and MnSCU regulations, conveys the rights and responsibilities of its constituents, including codes for conduct and acceptable behavior. In its consistent administration of these policies, the university models responsible citizenship, assuring that constituents are treated equally and fairly.


The university Code of Student Conduct provides an example of Bemidji State’s interest in honor, dignity, integrity and responsible behavior. From the introduction to the code:


LL2

The BSU Student Code of Conduct and Student Conduct System are an integral part of Bemidji State University's mission. The student conduct system contributes to the teaching of appropriate individual and group behavior and establishes behavioral expectations to foster a campus community free from disruption and harm. Students are expected to be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct, and the Student Conduct System. The rights and responsibilities of students and the expectations of the University are described in this handbook along with grievance and other procedures. Behavior that is threatening to the safety or welfare of one's self or others, or that is harassing or discriminatory in nature, will be reviewed promptly by the University, and appropriate action will be taken.


The code follows MnSCU practices and provides for appeals. For example, the Student Program and Admission (SPA) Committee reviews and acts on academic appeals by students.


Bemidji State demonstrates responsible citizenship through other means, as well, including the following:

  • Bargaining unit agreements that address conduct and responsibility concerns such as equal opportunity, non-discrimination, affirmative action, and mediation of disputes.

  • Responsible Men, Responsible Women, a training session on discrimination and harassment required for employees and students.

  • Compliance with local, state and federal policies, procedures and laws.

  • Delegation of authority through established internal systems, such as the curriculum review process~ described above.


Cooperative decision making across the levels of the university is described in Criterion Two, 4. Planning Processes.


MM

Opportunities and services at Bemidji State are made available to external constituents based on established policies and processes, including the use of contracts and competitive bidding. Logs and records are kept and procedures are in place for appeals. These helps assure fair and equal treatment for internal and external constituents and contribute to the integrity of the university’s mission


NN

LEVEL DService to Diverse Populations and Cultures: The university also models civic engagement through its attention to diverse populations and cultures. In addition to academic and service programs noted above in E1 Engage, Signature Theme—International/multicultural understanding, the university encourages and supports diversity through its international studies programs, disability services, relationships with regional tribal, community and technical colleges and affirmative action hiring processes.


LEVEL CSignature Theme—Civic Engagement: Bemidji State’s commitment to civic engagement is demonstrated in student opportunities to participate in university practices and student organizations. Opportunities are supported in three general areas: university governance, student organizations and academic classes.


LEVEL DGovernance: Student participation and representation is sought at all levels of university decision-making. The president and vice presidents meet regularly with student leadership and the Student Senate Cabinet meets with the President’s Cabinet. The president of the student body gives a monthly report to the faculty senate.


The Student Senate provides representation for established committees, councils and related groups, such as the following:

  • President’s Commission~

  • Honors Council

  • College of Business, Technology and Communication Student Advisory Council

  • OTHERS HERE


Student representatives also serve on ad hoc committees and task forces, such as the following:

  • Liberal Education Task Force

  • HLC Self-study Criterion Committees

  • Administrative Positions Search Committees


RR2

The university’s Student Senate gives regular reports to the university president and the Faculty Association Senate and is a member of the Minnesota State University Student Association.


PP

LEVEL DStudent Organizations: These dynamic groups are good evidence that civic engagement is valued by Bemidji State students. The organizations are initiated and maintained by the students themselves with minimal direction from faculty and student services. There are currently seventy student organizations on campus.


LEVEL DAcademic Classes: Bemidji State has a history of encouraging civic engagement in its curriculum and in the community. Three recent surveys studied the kinds and levels of civic engagement at Bemidji State:

  • 2001: Telling Our Stories: Outreach and Partnership Efforts at Bemidji State University, Committee for Outreach and Partnership.~

  • 2005: Inventory of Civic Engagement, Dr. Elizabeth Dunn, History Department; Dr. Colleen Greer, Sociology Department~

  • 2008: Campus Compact, Dr. Liza Erwin, Vice President for Student Development & Enrollment~


The 2005 Inventory of Civic Engagement report recommends that Bemidji State undertake a systematic inventory of civic engagement activities at the university. The 2008 Campus Compact report recommends that the university pursue the opening of a service learning and civic engagement center.


Based on the results of the 2005 and 2008 reports, Bemidji State has identified civic engagement as one of its three major Priorities for Improvement.~


Civic engagement is discussed further in Chapter Five.~


LEVEL CExternal Constituents

Bemidji State’s promise to “embrace responsible citizenship” is evidenced in its actions and practices with external constituents, especially at the local, regional and state levels, including those identified below. For discussions of services, collaborative projects, and needs and expectations shared by the university and its external constituents, see Chapter Five.~


QQ

Core Component 1c: Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization.


Core Component 1d: The organization’s governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission.


Core Component 1e: The organization upholds and protects its integrity.









QQ2



HMU is "powered" by wind energy.

Thanks to the student fee-funded purchase of 616,000 kilowatt- hours of wind energy per month- approximate usage of the Hobson Memorial Union. Bemidji State University is now the largest Ottertail Power Company wind energy customer in its tri state region.

The Environment

Even though the electricity we use in the Union- for lights, computers, etc.- is not coming directly from Ottertail's turbine, through our purchase we are supporting efforts to reduce pollution caused by conventional sources of energy. 


It's just one way BSU is striving to be a better environmental steward.









RR

Excerpts from Master Facility Plan, Top Ten Capital Improvement Projects:

  • promote sustainability by creating dedicated space for organic gardens for the campus food service

  • allow vacant landscaped areas to naturalize,

  • dedicate one residence hall as "green,” providing priority parking for high mileage-low emission vehicles and "green free" remote parking lots

  • commit to adopting "clean and green" maintenance procedures

  • consider aligning with Talloires Declaration consortium of colleges and universities across the world dedicated to environmental and sustainable development. (Note: Bemidji State is in the process of aligning with the Talloires Declaration.)



SS

Sustainability Project

Native plant bed installed on campus: BEMIDJI, Minn. — In place of colorful, labor and chemical intensive annual flowers, visitors to Bemidji State University will find a bed of beautiful native perennials residing in the raised beds between the A.C. Clark Library, the upper Hobson Memorial Union and Sanford Hall.

E3 Educate for a Future that Can Only Be Imagined

(Core Components 1c, 1d, 1e)


QQ

Bemidji State has educated for the future since its inception as a teacher training college. The “future” of today, however, is utterly different than the future anticipated at the beginning of the last century: the speed at which life changes has increased wildly. Information—and misinformation—is available at the click of a computer mouse. Education today must be a blend of knowledge acquisition, critical thinking skills, a cultivated aptitude for change and the ability to make sound decisions based on reason and on past experience. This future includes not only human affairs, but the well-being and even the fate of Earth itself.


LEVEL CInternal Constituents

In preparation for learning throughout their lives, students today benefit from knowing how to adapt adapting to and learning from new situations. Bemidji State teaches these skills through dynamic programming, responsive planning and implementation processes, and modeling a commitment to environmental stewardship.


LEVEL DLifelong Learning: Bemidji State’s diversified student population, relevant academic programs and civic engagement opportunities give students real-life experiences in living with change and expands their horizons even while they are still on campus. The university is intentional in presenting these experiential opportunities. See Chapter Four, Criterion Four and Priorities for Improvement: Civic Engagement for detailed discussions of civic engagement. Bemidji State also educates students for lives and careers in the immediate future by offering new and revised academic programs, such those noted above in E1 Engage in New Worlds of Thought. By attending to the vitality of its offerings, the university models the value of responding and adapting to change in its social and cultural environment.


LEVEL DActive Planning Processes: In addition to providing students with a dynamic learning environment, Bemidji State, recognizing the unpredictable nature of societal and economic trends, models through its own planning processes the values of change and adaptation. For example, since the 2000 self-study, three significant changes have been implemented in administrative structures:

  • The office of Vice President for Student Development and Enrollment has been opened.~ (See Feature Story “The Learning Journey.”)

  • The university’s college structure has been reorganized. (See Feature Story “Reorg.”)

  • The Information Technology Services was reorganized and is led by a Chief Information Officer.


LEVEL DSignature Theme—Environmental Stewardship: Bemidji State recognizes that the future of human endeavor is tied to the future of Earth and that the tending of earthly gardens begins at home. In its academic programs and institutional planning, the university models appropriate stewardship of the physical environment in which it resides.


LEVEL EAcademic Programs: In 1998, Bemidji State introduced People and the Environment, Category 10, into its Liberal Education curriculum. The goals for the requirement are defined by the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum:

To improve students' understanding of today's complex environmental challenges. Students will examine the interrelatedness of human society and the natural environment. Knowledge of both bio-physical principles and socio-cultural systems is the foundation for integrative and critical thinking about environmental issues.


The university enhanced the model by creating a course structure with discipline-based breakout sections and interdisciplinary large group panel discussions, providing students with a common learning experience.


Bemidji State offers Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Environmental Studies. Other related programs include the following:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Biology, including Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution; Wildlife Management

  • Bachelor of Science in Aquatic Biology, including Aquatic Systems; Fisheries Biology; Wetlands Ecology

  • Bachelor of Science in Geography, including Regional, Park, Recreational and Land Use Planning

  • Bachelor of Science in Wilderness Management and Outdoor Recreation Planning

  • Minor in Earth Science

  • Earth and Space Science Specialty, Science Education Teacher Licensure


Courses related to environmental stewardship are offered in other programs, as well, most notably in Liberal Education Category 10, People and the Environment.

Two student organizations are directly committed to environmental concerns:

        • Society of Geology and Environmental Geo-Science (SGEGS)

        • Students for the Environment


QQ2

LEVEL EUniversity Planning: The university models environmental stewardship in its planning documents and its actions. For example, in addition to the environmental stewardship signature theme, the 2008-2013 strategies include the following:

Strategy B: Promote Vital Communities through Involvement

B.4 Promote environmental vitality.

Work with partners to assure the environmental stewardship of our shared communities.


Strategy D: Optimize Resources to Achieve the University’s Vision and Mission

D.6 Provide stewardship of the campus physical environment.

Explore means and methods to model responsibility toward the land and other natural resources.


Following from the University Plan, the Master Academic and Master Facilities Plans address environmental stewardship concerns:


Master Academic Plan (MAP)

2 Hire and Support Excellent Faculty

Decision Parameter: Encourages people who are hired to continue to build on the existing scholarship agendas and interests that support international, environmental, American Indian, natural resource, assessment, and civic engagement topics.


Master Facilities Plan

RR

Goals: 14. Improve the campus environmental quality: Environmental stewardship is one of the three core values of Bemidji State University. This plan promotes sustainability primarily through site development, and alignment with the mandated B3 Guidelines for sustainable development.


Differences from the previous Master Facilities Plan: 6. Recommendations for environmentally sustainable site and building development.


Suggested improvements from Student, Faculty, Staff and Community Surveys: k. Encourage a campus wide environmental ethic.


In the top ten capital improvement projects for the next ten years: Improve the campus environmental quality.


SS

As further evidence that a commitment to environmental stewardship pervades the campus culture, the Student Senate initiated and passed a bill requiring students to pay a five dollar “green fee” each semester. This fee contributes to the salary of a Sustainability Coordinator, matched by university funding. The position is operational.


LEVEL CExternal Constituents

As part of its mission “to educate for the future,” Bemidji State supports educational opportunities for its external constituents. These outreach programs serve a broad range of constituents, from other educational institutions such as high schools and two-year colleges to Marvin Windows, a significant employer in northern Minnesota.


As noted above in E2 Embrace Responsible Citizenship, External Constituents, relationships with external constituents are discussed Chapter Five, Criterion Five.



Priorities for Improvement

For the past several years, Bemidji State has engaged in the consideration and study of civic engagement on its campus and in its local community. The results of the studies and the discussions indicate that more can be done to (1) assure civic engagement opportunities for all students and (2) to assist faculty and staff in the development of such opportunities.


To that end, the university has opened ((info on the civic engagement office)) and proposes ??((present a plan here??)).


((Goals, and outcomes??



Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.


Criterion One: Mission and Integrity

Summary of Evidence


Core Component 1a: The organization’s mission documents are clear and articulate publicly the organization’s commitments.


Core Component 1b: In its mission documents, the organization recognizes the diversity of its learners, other constituencies, and the greater society it serves.


Core Component 1c: Understanding of and support for the mission pervade the organization.


Core Component 1d: The organization’s governance and administrative structures promote effective leadership and support collaborative processes that enable the organization to fulfill its mission.

Core Component 1e: The organization upholds and protects its integrity.

DRAFT—Chapter Two, Criterion Two

Bemidji State University-HLC 2010 Reaccreditation Self-Study Report


Below is a draft of Criterion Two of Bemidji State’s 2010 HLC self-study document. The self-study writing team invites you to comment freely on the content and to provide information regarding notes that are shaded in gray.


The writing team thanks the five criterion committees for their ongoing work. They are providing content and evidence for the document and are commenting on drafts. To view their work, visit the self-study web site <http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/> and click on Committees in the left column. Other information about our self-study process is also available on this site.


Please send your comments to Marty Wolf (mwolf, # 23, 2825). We would like them by November 6 so that we may consider them as we complete the document. Questions may also be addressed to Marty.


Self-Study Deadlines

Due Dates

Actions

10/16/09

Draft to campus.

11/06/09

Comments due to writing team.

12/01/09

Completed copy to Production Office.

01/22/10

Self-study due at HLC offices.

02/15/10

Mock visit.

03/22-24/10

HLC team campus visit.


READING & COMMENTING ON THE 10/16/2009 DRAFT

On weird things in the text:

Regarding your comments:

Regarding previous Criterion Committee comments:

Regarding the Core Components


HLC Writing Team

Elizabeth Dunn, HLC Co-chair (Interim Dean, College of Arts & Sciences)

Marty Wolf, HLC Faculty Co-chair (Math & Computer Science Department)

Susan Hauser, Writer (English Department)


Shaping Potential/Shaping Worlds

Story here...


Criterion Two: Preparing for the Future

The organization’s allocation of resources and its processes for evaluation and planning demonstrate its capacity to fulfill its mission, improve the quality of its education, and respond to future challenges and opportunities.



Organization of Criterion Two

Introduction

1. Consistent Mission, Refined Identity (Core Components 2a, 2d)

2. Societal and Economic Trends (Core Component 2a)

3. Planning Documents (Core Components 2a, 2d)

4. Planning Processes (Core Components 2a, 2d)

5. Resource Base (Core Components 2b, 2d)

6. Assessment Systems (Core Components 2b, 2c)

7. Funding Follows Planning: Closing the Loop (Core Components 2a, 2d)

8. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence


Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825

Introduction

Bemidji State University utilizes embedded planning to guide decision-making, assess outcomes, determine actions, allocate resources and prepare for the future. In fulfillment of, and guided by, its mission, the university continually adapts its processes in order to assure the quality of its education, its capacity to fulfill its mission, and its ability to respond to anticipated and unanticipated challenges and opportunities.



Core Component 2a: The organization realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends.


Core Component 2d: All levels of planning align with the organization’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission.










Vision: Shaping Potential, Shaping Worlds

Bemidji State University is a catalyst for shaping the potential of those it serves who, in turn, shape the worlds in which they live and work.


Mission: E3 Engage, Embrace, Educate

As northern Minnesota’s university, we engage in new worlds of thought, embrace responsible citizenship, and educate for a future that can only be imagined.











Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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1. Consistent Mission, Refined Identity

(Core Components 2a, 2d)

Over the past twenty-five years, since 1985, the university has had four mission statements. While they vary in form and detail, they are consistent in emphasis:


Mission Statements

1985-1988~

Excerpts

1988-1996~

Excerpts

1996-2008~ Excerpts

2008-Present

Statement

a sound liberal education”

a broad liberal education complementing academic specialization”

new ideas and new skills ... grounded in shared human values”

Engage in new worlds of thought

responsible, free citizens in a democratic society”

function responsibly as members of an interdependent, international community”

enhance student access to leadership roles and encourage responsible citizenship”

Embrace responsible citizenship

instill in each student the spark of intellectual pursuit”

support continuing inquiry”

lead its students into the twenty-first century”

Educate for a future we can only imagine


The core of Bemidji State’s mission is thus clear and is economically expressed in its current statement.


The primary elements of the university’s identity have also remained constant throughout the years as expressed in the university’s past vision and mission statements:


1985-1988

1988-1996

1996-2008

Mission: “comprehensive university with a balance of professional and vocational programs and with a strong commitment to the liberal arts”

Mission: “a broad liberal education complementing academic specialization”


(Vision statements were not utilized at this time.)

Mission: “has grown into a comprehensive university”


Vision: “our guideposts are clear: excellence in liberal education and career preparation”



This identity was further clarified in the University Plan: Strategies for 2002-2007, Five-Year Goal Statement:

  • To be the Midwest’s premier student-centered university integrating liberal arts with career development to prepare students for life-long learning and leadership in a global society.


If we do an official Identity Statement, this could be revised to include it in the table above.

In the several years leading up to the 2008-2013 University Plan, Bemidji State continued to reflect on its institutional identity. In colleges and departments, at campus meetings and at other venues, the meanings, values and implications of a “comprehensive” versus “arts and sciences” university were considered. The discussions led to a watershed reorganization of the university’s colleges and academic departments. (See Reorg Feature Story)

  • Press release, August 8, 2008: “... The reorganization will support the University's goal of ... a more-focused identity as a university of arts and sciences with select professional programs...”


The current vision and mission statements do not directly declare the university’s identity. This is standard practice today. However, both vision and mission support self-identification as an arts and sciences university with select professional programs.



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Bemidji State University is a member of the Minnesota State Colleges and University System.


MnSCU Strategic Plan 2008-2012


Strategic Direction 1: Increase access and opportunity


Strategic Direction 2: Promote and measure high-quality learning programs and services


Strategic Direction 3: Provide programs and services that enhance the economic competitiveness of the state and its regions


Strategic Direction 4: Innovate to meet current and future educational needs










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Ideas?
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2. Societal and Economic Trends

(Core Component 2a)

The university is keenly aware of societal and economic trends that affect its operations and the educational opportunities of its students. By way of example, in its 2008-2013 University Plan, Bemidji State identified external forces that posed particular challenges for the university:


University Plan 2008-2013 Strengths, Challenges, Opportunities, Threats (SCOT) External Threats

External Threats:


The Changing Landscape of Education: Higher education in the United States faces a number of issues in a constantly shifting landscape. Funding for higher education is gradually shifting from public to private sources. Students and their families are up picking more of the costs, and state governments are funding less and less. This shift in costs brings with it new concerns for growing levels of student debt as well as concerns for how the university will replace lost resources to continue to meet its commitment to the region.


In addition, there is a greater call for accountability at all levels. MnSCU is transitioning to performance based measures for student success and learning. Conversations at the federal level have recently centered on student access and affordability, and institutional accountability. Bemidji State University must be able to articulate clearly ways in which students succeed and learn. This means that the university needs to continue to develop in data gathering and interpretation.


The Changing Societal Landscape of Northern Minnesota: As the university moved through an 18-month strategic planning process known as scenario planning, it identified external societal drivers that will impact the university’s environment. The first was the changing demographics of our region and the state. As mentioned earlier, the northern Minnesota region will experience a decline in the traditional college-aged student. Second, traditional students coming to the university have a new set of educational expectations, including new expectations related to technology and course delivery. Third, changes in technology will continue to impact university operations in ways we cannot fully imagine. Combined, these represent societal changes in our external environment which the University must address.


The Student Development and Enrollment Strategic Plan 2008-2013, known as the J-Plan (Journey Plan, reflecting the division’s mission), in its SCOT, identified similar challenges:


Student Development & Enrollment Master Plan, Strengths, Challenges, Opportunities, Threats (SCOT)

External Threats

Student Development and Enrollment continually works to overcome the exigencies of changing student demographics; of unfunded external regulations and mandates; and of the challenges of obtaining external funding. It does this in the context of a rapidly changing educational landscape that includes shifts in funding (from public to private), a call for greater institutional accountability, and a stressed student population. Many of today’s students struggle to balance study, work and family, and also struggle with health and well-being difficulties. Their determination to attend the university is underwritten by a sense of hope that through their effort they will find a way to a more satisfying and secure life. Bemidji State strives to understand and meet that expectation.


The above SCOT statements were developed prior to the fragile state, national and international economic situation that precipitated out late in 2008 and continues into the present. The devastating effects of that phenomenon are ameliorated at Bemidji State in part because of its extensive overall planning and, specifically, because of a proactive, three-year budget, 2007-2010, developed prior to the economic collapse. This budget plan was written to respond to already tightened resources and to project in the future rather than mostly presenting short-term, stop-gap measures ((??Feature: Three-year Budget Plan~)) and resulted in a greater percentage of funds dedicated to direct instructional costs. While the three-year plan responded primarily to internal concerns, the current four-year, 2010-2014 budget plan responds primarily to the external pressures of state and national economies.


The Master Facilities Plan also recognizes the significance of demographic trends:


Campus Initiatives

There are many projects that need urgent attention to respond to an aging infrastructure, challenging market trends and cultural forces that are changing the way higher education is delivered. These changes are occurring faster than public financing (General Obligation and Revenue Bonding) can respond to, and therefore, must be creatively addressed with college operating funds, as well as private resources. In many cases, these needs will expand into major capital projects as the immediate investment needs identified above are implemented. But until that time, a minimum level of investment must be implemented in order to provide


Demographics and Growth

The demographic trends for the northwest region of the state and particularly for the eleven surrounding counties indicate projected population growth of approximately 28% between 2000 and 2030. However, neither institution will be able to rely on an expanding school age population base as a resource for future students since the overwhelming trend in Minnesota is for a much older population with a stable population predicted for the 25-44 year old category and only a slight increase in the 15-24 year age group. Each institution will need to work hard at attracting students from outside the region, improving the attendance rate of the regional population, and encouraging the movement of students at the certificate and associate degree levels to "ladder" to higher levels of education.


Core Component 2a: The organization realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends.


Core Component 2d: All levels of planning align with the organization’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission.





Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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3. Planning Documents

(Core Components 2a, 2d)


Bemidji State University utilizes multiple layers of planning to guide its actions and the expenditure of its resources. These layers include mission-related documents and established and ad hoc planning committees, councils, task forces and work groups. Planning is aligned with resources and is conducted in the light of current societal and economic trends as identified in planning documents.


Bemidji State’s planning operates at three levels:

Primary Mission Document:

  • Level I University Plan

Foundational Mission Documents

  • Level II Master Plans

  • Level III College and Department Plans

  • Level III University Services Plans


As noted in Chapter One, values and actions of Bemidji State University originate in academic departments. These are coordinated and framed by college plans which, in turn, inform the Master Academic Plan (MAP). The MAP informs other master plans.


The foundational mission documents inform the 2002-2007 and 2008-2013 University Plans which were developed in reference to the 1996-2008 vision and mission statements. However, as noted earlier, the new vision and mission statements are not contradictory to previous iterations. Rather, they reflect a focusing and honing of vision, mission and identity.


Bemidji State’s mission documents are compatible with the mission documents of the Minnesota State Universities and Colleges as noted in the HLC Crosswalk~. The crosswalk also aligns master and college strategic documents with MnSCU and HLC.






















Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Level I Documents


Level C Previous University Plan, Strategies for 2002-2007

In 2000, after its self-study, the university began development of a formalized strategic plan, Strategies for 2002-2007. It was prepared by the Vice President for Academic Affairs in consultation and cooperation with other vice presidents, deans, and bargaining units and was adopted through formal processes. It included vision and mission statements, a five-year goal statement, a SCOT (Strengths, Challenges, Opportunities, Threats), and four planning strategies:

Strategy A: Maintain, Expand, and Diversify Resources to Enhance Educational Excellence

Strategy B: Support Excellence in Learning Programs and Services

Strategy C: Align Resources with Priorities Identified in Five-Year Goal Statement

Strategy D: Enhance Institutional Decision-Making and Shared Governance


The strategies included action steps and value statements (in italic). By way of example:


Strategy B: Support Excellence in Learning Programs and Services, Action Step 1

Through Liberal Education and Honors, prepare students for life-long learning and leadership in a global society. Identify and support excellence and innovation in the Liberal Education curriculum....


To operationalize the strategies, a Work Plan was developed that identified directors and interested parties and set forth specific tasks to be addressed.


By way of example, a selection from the Work Plan for Action Step 1, above:


Work Plan 26A

Liberal Education and Honors Curriculum and Assessment

Work Plan Director: Dean of Arts & Letters; Director of Liberal Education

Time Line: 2004-2005 and ongoing


Continue curriculum development and further increase the use of learning outcomes assessment of the liberal arts curriculum delivered through Liberal Education and through the Honors program.


Task 1 [of five tasks]

Continue to develop and implement assessment measures of the Liberal Education and Honors curriculums. Suggested Participants: Liberal Education Committee, Honors Council, Academic Affairs Committee. 2004-2005


The Work Plan was followed by an annual report on each Work Plan item. By way of example, the report for Work Plan 26A, above:


2003-2004 Status Report Summary

Discussions continued with the Liberal Education Committee, Liberal Education Director, and Dean of CAL on assessment of Liberal Education outcomes. The Liberal Education Director attended a national conference on Liberal Education assessment. A BSU proposal to the AAC&U Institute on General Education in Newport, Rhode Island, was accepted, and a team of five faculty and staff (three faculty members from Liberal Education Committee, the Liberal Education Director, and the Dean of CAL). The BSU proposal focused on Liberal Education assessment and identification of a unifying theme for Liberal Education reform. The outcome of this retreat will become part of the work for next year.


An NEH grant to provide resources for faculty to develop the civic responsibility component of Liberal Education was submitted (by Dr. Colleen Greer and Dr. Elizabeth Dunn); it was unsuccessful but was revised and will be submitted again [to NEH or elsewhere].


The anticipated MnSCU-wide Conference on the Liberal Arts, to be held in conjunction with the MnSCU Center for Teaching and Learning, was not held. With regard to other MnSCU sponsored faculty workshops, eight Bemidji State faculty members participated in four or more MnSCU Discipline Workshops during 2003-2004. An additional 11 faculty participated in Weekend Seminars or Conferences.


Work Plans and annual Summary Status Reports are distributed campus-wide.


Level C Current University Plan, Strategies for 2008-2013

The four strategies of the 2008-2013 University Plan, roughly parallel to the strategies in the 2002-2007 plan, indicate a refinement of focus toward student success, engagement, innovation and mission:

  • Strategy A: Engage Students for Success in Careers, Communities and Life

  • Strategy B: Promote Vital Communities through Involvement

  • Strategy C: Innovate for a Changing World

  • Strategy D: Optimize Resources to Achieve the University’s Vision and mission


The 2002-2007 plan was developed in consultation with the university community; the 2008-2013 plan was developed cooperatively with the university community. Increased participation was encouraged by five years of open campus discussions that encouraged input and feedback. Venues included the following:

  • Work Plan Activities and Reports

  • Scenario Planning~

  • Campus Conversations~

  • Campus Budget Forums~

  • Academic Forums~

  • Faculty Conversation on Curriculum, Enrollment and Workload, October 13, 2006~


The 2008-2013 University Plan reflects these many voices. By way of example, an excerpt from Closing the Loop: Campus Conversation with Crosswalk to Strategies for 2008-2013: ~ CLOSING THE LOOP Campus Conversation 9/25/07


Strategy C: Innovate for a Changing World

Number of tables discussing issue

Issue

Location of Related Item in Strategies for 2008-2013

NOTE: Specific manifestation of the items are accommodated in the Work Plan that will be developed from the approved strategies. E.g., A.4 Strengthen measurement of student achievement. Sample Work Plan Item: Revise the university’s assessment plan to support the new vision and mission.

16 (of 22)

Recognize unique, individual student needs and have the flexibility to meet students where they are

A.1 Support students’ professional and personal development through high quality educational programs and services.

Prepare students for careers, citizenship, community service, life-long learning and leadership:

  • through engaged, academic preparation in the Liberal Education and Honors programs and the majors;

  • through student-centered programs and services that assure access and success. [*]


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BBB

Excerpt: Facilities Master Plan SCOT

University buildings, grounds, and other attributes are on a continuing schedule of maintenance, renovation, and innovation as directed by the Master Facilities Plan. Bemidji State University was recently recognized by the National Wildlife Federation for its sound environmental practices, and its Outdoor Program Center ranks among the most active such organizations in the country and includes as part of its facilities the university’s 240-acre forest.


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CCC

Decision parameters for a Master Technology Plan include the following:

  • Prioritizes technology initiatives.

  • Develops multi-year funding and budgeting strategies for replacing and upgrading information technology equipment.

  • Examines the strengths and weaknesses of the University’s current academic and administrative computing environment.

  • Identifies and evaluates new emerging technologies.

  • Explores opportunities to better support scholarship of faculty, staff, and students.

  • Explores opportunities to better support the internal functions of the Bemidji State website.

  • Reviews and develops new technology policies governing use of campus technology resources.

  • Develops opportunities for greater communication and collaboration with the campus, local and regional employers, tribal colleges, and other peer institutions.

  • Aligns with system technology planning efforts.





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Level II Master Plans

The University Plan’s Strategies for 2008-2013 promote integrated master plans as a means to creativity, innovation, and change:


Strategy C: Innovate for a Changing World

Goal Seven Decentralize planning and decision-making through use of university master plans that invite interpretation and discovery, and support creativity and innovation.


C.3 Continue integration of plans across all levels and units of the university. [Value Statement:] Support a climate of institutional change through ongoing development, revision and integration of the Level I University Plan: Strategies for 2008-2013, Level II master plans, and Level III college and/or department strategic plans.


The university currently has four master plans:

  • Academic (MAP)

  • Facilities~

  • Student Development and Enrollment (J-Plan)~

  • Technology~


The following discussions indicate the close integration of the master plans to the University Plan.


Level C Master Academic Plan (MAP)

The relationship of the MAP to the University Plan is acknowledged in the introduction to the MAP:


Planning Assumptions: The Master Academic Plan is based initially on the University Plan and incorporates the following assumptions derived from analysis of the university’s relative strengths and weaknesses vis-à-vis the university’s external and internal environments.” [Seven assumptions are listed.]


Desired Outcomes for the Master Academic Plan: As mentioned earlier, this Master Academic Plan coordinates and further develops those portions of the University Plan that are uniquely academic. In particular, it develops Strategy B of the University Plan and begins to answer questions posed in Strategy A. [Six outcomes are listed.]


The relationship of the MAP to college and department planning follows in “Level III College and Department Plans.”


Level C Master Facilities Plan~

The Master Facilities Plan, which is aligned with facilities planning for Northwest Technical College, takes the Master Academic Plan as its primary reference:

Master Facilities Plan Goals

1. Support the respective institutional master academic plans: It is the primary goal of the Bemidji State University Master Plan aligned with Northwest Technical College master plan to create campus facilities that support the academic mission and goals of the institutions by providing instructional space that is well-organized and equipped, attractive and readily accessed.


The 2003 Master Facilities and Campus Plan was updated in 2007 and reflects the values and directives expressed in the 2002-2007 University Plan.


By way of example:

SCOT, Strengths: The University Campus

Next to its academic and student-centered reputation, Bemidji State is perhaps best known for its compelling natural setting on the shores of Lake Bemidji. The University takes seriously its role in the stewardship of the land entrusted to it. It also recognizes that the physical environment of a campus contributes to its learning environment.

BBB


Mission Statement (excerpt)

Offer a pleasing and safe campus community enriched by native heritage and world cultures; united by human values centered on civility and mutual respect; and underpinned by facilities necessary for education in the twenty-first century.


The 2007 Master Facilities Plan also complements the University Plan Strategies for 2008-2013.


By way of example:

A.1 ...enhance on-campus housing facilities....

A.3 Encourage facilities’ planning that supports learning and community. Provide welcoming spaces on campus that promote an ambiance for learning, and opportunities for interaction and community.

D.6. Continue to integrate all planning efforts.



Level C Master Student Development and Enrollment Plan (The Learning Journey, J-Plan, 2008-2013)


Developed in 2008, the J-Plan acknowledges the 2008-2013 University Plan as a source for its planning assumptions:

The Learning Journey Plan (J-Plan) ... also acknowledges trends and needs identified in the University Plan: Strategies for 2008-2013, including changing student demographics, a shifting financial base, and an increased emphasis on preparing students for uncertain futures, personal, national and global.


The J-Plan also echoes the goals of the University Plan’s Strategy A: Engage Students for Success in Careers, Communities and Life~.


By way of example:

J-Plan 2008-2013 Mission: We’re here for the journey, investing in our students’ success through excellent programs and services focused on learning and development.

Desired Outcomes [Excerpt]:

  1. Support and promote students’ personal well-being.

  2. Challenge and support, i.e., empower, students as they navigate their journey.

  3. Ensure ease of access to the university and to campus services and programs.


The university supports the J-Plan through funding and other resource allocations. See Feature Story: Student Development and Enrollment.~


Level C Master Technology Plan~

The Master Technology Plan, which is aligned with facilities planning for Northwest Technical College, is predicated on the University Plan:

Our strategic plan for technology will create a framework to support the vision, mission, strategies, goals, and signature themes of our institutions. As the needs of our University, technical college, and our respective constituencies evolve, the implementation of technology and technology support structures will also evolve in order to meet the ever changing demands of higher education.


The plan also supports technology needs identified in the Master Academic Plan. By way of example:

MAP Outcome 2G: Technology Training and Support: As technology advances, the role of the Center for Extended Learning in support of faculty development will be critical. Through the Online Services Office, the Center for Extended Learning provides support for faculty and prepares them to meet the challenges of delivering technology-enhanced learning opportunities.

CCC







Academic Department Five-year Plans are discussed at length in Chapter Three: Criterion Three












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Level III College and Academic Department Plans

As noted above, college and academic department plans are foundational to the university’s mission. The plans are coordinated through the Master Academic Plan (MAP). The 2005 MAP expresses six designated outcomes:

1. High quality programs (Provide high quality educational programs and services that support students’ professional, personal, and citizenship development.)

2. Excellent faculty (Hire and support excellent faculty.)

3. Secure future for Northern Minnesota (Help build the future of Northern Minnesota.)

4. Diverse student, staff and programming (Enhance diversity.)

5. Excellent teaching and learning environment (Support the teaching and learning environment.)

6. Financial stability (Secure financial stability through appropriate growth and program development.)


The outcomes have additional sub-categories. By way of example, the first outcome, High Quality Programs, is divided into A. Core Values and Signature Themes, B. Curricular Philosophies, C. Assessment of Student Progress.


To assist colleges, departments and faculty, each sub-category also has Decision Parameters. As noted in the MAP document, they may be applied in several ways:


  • They provide a basis for the authoring of initiatives by the colleges and departments.

  • They provide a basis for college and academic affairs decision-making with regard to initiatives.

  • They invite interpretation and discovery. For example, review of the parameters might suggest a different frame or approach to an activity already built into an initiative, and might also provoke consideration of new approaches and activities. (Larry Hirschhorn and Linda May, “The Campaign Approach to Change: Targeting the University’s Scarcest Resources,” Change, June 2000)


By way of example, there are three Decision Parameters for 1A Core Values and Signature Themes:


  • As appropriate, intentionally incorporates experiences that reflect the Signature Themes.

  • As appropriate, promotes opportunities for students to confront or engage in experiences that reflect the Signature Themes.

  • As appropriate, helps ensure that every graduate will have had opportunities to learn about, experience and reflect on the Core Values expressed in the Signature Themes.


To further guide implementation of the MAP, each sub-category clearly states expectations specific to colleges, departments and programs. These are identified with the heading “To this end.”


By way of example, for 1A Core Values and Signature Themes:

To this end:

  • The Liberal Education Task Force is encouraged to consider carefully these core values and signature themes as it proceeds with the redesign of the Liberal Education program.

  • College Strategic Plans are expected to address the inclusion of these core values and signature themes in Department Plans.


Departmental participation in the MAP is tracked in annual reports. By way of example, the English Department, College of Arts & Letters, prepared reports addressing each section of the MAP where “To this end” items included department plans: ((Link to SCH 02))


English Department Response, December 2006 (excerpt)

I. Provide high quality educational programs and services that support students’ professional, personal, and citizenship development [MAP Outcome]

A. Core values and signature themes [MAP sub-category]
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT: These are addressed in course and program curricula and anthology publishing projects (New Voices, Dust & Fire, Rivers Meeting, Fire Ring Voices), and with the offerings of the Minnesota Northwoods Writers Conference. For example:
International/multicultural understanding: Courses in English Literature, Ethnic American Literature, and World Literature.
Civic engagement: Production of anthologies that publish the work of high school students, women, men, and Bemidji State students.
Environmental stewardship: Course offerings such as Nature Writing in the People & the Environment Liberal Education category.


As noted previously, the university’s colleges and departments were recently reorganized, effective July 1, 2008. The three new colleges engaged in inclusive processes for writing their mission statements.


By way of example, the time line for development of the College of Arts & Sciences (CAS) vision and mission:

  • October 3: All-college (faculty and staff)work session on shared values among faculty.

  • Notes distributed to chairs.

  • December 10, 2008: Joint meeting of two colleges, HSHE and CAS, to workshop visions and missions with a facilitator.

  • Draft to faculty for comment.

  • February 18, 2009: Meeting with volunteers to refine statements based on feedback.

  • New drafts to departments and individual faculty for final comment.

  • February 29, 2009: Minor revisions by CAS chairs.

  • Final version sent to faculty and taken to Deans’ Council.


Level III University Services Plans (Student Development and Enrollment)

These plans are guided by the master plans, especially the J-Plan~ which, as noted above, coordinates with the University Plan.


The J-Plan was developed by university services directors through a cooperative process, as noted in the plan: “During the 2007-2008 academic year, the division initiated a planning process that included exploration of the unit’s identity and values, interviews with students and faculty, and reflection on student learning and success in the co-curriculum” (Development of the Learning Journey).


For further discussion of The J-Plan see Chapter Four, Criterion Four.


Core Component 2a: The organization realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends.


Core Component 2d: All levels of planning align with the organization’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission.


MMM

Resources Allocation Supports Mission & Identity

In response to State of Minnesota budget cuts, the university cut each of the three college budgets by $250,000 over three years. The College of Arts & Science is twice the size of the other two colleges. The cut, therefore, favors CAS, preserving resources at the core of the university’s identity.





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4. Planning Processes

(Core Components 2a, 2d)


At the time of the last self-study, in 2000, the Experimental Planning Process~, a formalized system was newly in place. It featured three layers of committees, not unlike a three-dimensional chessboard with connections running both horizontally and vertically. An update on the process was required in a 2002 Monitoring Report~. That report was accepted by the Higher Learning Commission/North Central Association.

As noted below and in Change in Plans~ in the 2002 Monitoring Report Update, the university continues to develop its planning processes.


Change in Process

In theory, the Experimental Planning Process was a good idea. It provided communication and planning opportunities for students, faculty, staff and administration. In practice, however, it was logistically untenable. (See sidebar, The Experimental Planning Process.) It was suspended December 2003. A consultant, Dan Rice, was brought in to review and evaluate the planning situation at Bemidji State. In his report~, he recommended improved communication on campus among major constituents (administration, faculty and staff). This was also a recommendation of the Scenario Planning Committee and is reflected in the University Plan for 2008-2013, especially in Strategy C: Innovate for a Changing World. ~


Strategy C

Goal Seven: Decentralize planning and decision-making through use of university master plans

that invite interpretation and discovery, and support creativity and innovation.

Initiatives:

C.1 Increase organizational capacity for a successful, compelling and collegial campus culture. Improve the success of the university through increased communication, and support for collaboration.

C.2 Continue to develop the university’s planning process. Guide decision-making in support of the vision and mission with an understanding of the nature and impact of uncertain and critical driving forces that affect the future.


After the experimental process was discontinued, and while a new process was being considered, committees, councils, task forces and work groups were formed as needed. Some were ad hoc, some were intended to be permanent. All were guided by the University Plan and other mission documents.


During the early reflection stage of this self-study, the planning process was frequently discussed. At first there was concern that a new, formalized planning structure was not in place. But as the means for planning from 2006-2009 were reviewed, it became evident that, in addition to the planning documents, a structure was in place, one that had emerged organically. It has two primary facets:

  • Established committees and councils

  • Ad hoc committees, task forces and work groups


The new, more fluid process encourages flexible planning in service to the university’s mission.


Established Committees and Councils

As noted above, the current planning process at Bemidji State evolved organically after its highly structured experimental planning process was discontinued. While the university explored other structured options, the administration, staff and faculty responded to needs as they arose and to the imperatives inherent in the University Plan.


Five established (ongoing) groups that evolved through that process are currently in place. Overlap in membership assures cross-communication among university constituencies, including faculty, students, staff and bargaining units.

  • Leadership Council~

  • Futures Council~

  • Cabinet~

  • Assessment Committee~

  • Gaps and Trends Committee~


Ad Hoc Task Forces, Committees and Work Groups

In addition to its planning documents and established committees and councils, the university has increased its utilization of ad hoc groups to address timely projects. Membership is determined by the administration and appropriate bargaining units. By way of example, three such ad hoc groups have played significant roles in the sharpening of the university’s vision, mission and identity:

  • Liberal Education Task Force~Link to LE Feature

  • Reorganization Work Group~ link to Reorg Feature

  • Scenario Planning~


The New Flow Chart

As noted above, the current planning process at Bemidji State evolved organically. The resulting inter-connected processes...((introduce new flow chart here?))


Core Component 2b: The organization’s resource base supports its educational programs and its plans for maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future.


Core Component 2d: All levels of planning align with the organization’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission.




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5. Resource Base

(Core Components 2b, 2d)


Bemidji State University has clearly identified its resource base, utilizes it in support of maintaining and strengthening its mission, and makes plans to continue support in the future.


  • The University’s Resource Base

  • The Resource Base Supports Educational Programs

  • The Resource Base Supports Future Plans


The University’s Resource Base

Bemidji State’s current resource base is described in goals eight, nine and ten for Strategic Direction D: Optimize Resources to Achieve the University’s Vision and Mission in the University Plan 2008-2013.


By way of example:

Strategic Imperative: Effectively manage and increase enrollment and resources in support of the university’s vision and mission.


Goals and Measurements [Italics and bracketed comments added.]

  • Goal Eight Improve undergraduate and graduate enrollment, retention, and graduation rates. [I.e., tuition revenue.]

  • Goal Nine Improve revenues from external funding, including alumni giving, capital campaigns, and grants.

  • Goal Ten Address MnSCU efficiency measures and standards. [I.e., increase state allotments separate from tuition.]


This base reflects changes in funding trends that are now common across the country: as states have reduced their financing of public higher education from sixty-one percent in 1999-2000 to forty percent in 2009-2010, individual campuses have increased their utilization of endowments, community and alumni-based partnerships and other resources.


By way of example, Bemidji State has developed the following partnerships and collaborations. See Chapter Five for additional examples and information.


To assure that its resource base is adequate to its needs, the university continually works to align budget and program requirements (see University Plan 2002-2007, Strategic Direction C, Align Resources with Priorities)~. To this end, university budgeting has become more transparent and more open to campus input. The administration now holds budget forums~ several times a year and budget discussions are included in Academic Forums for vice presidents, deans and department chairs. This has led to greater understanding across campus of how budgets work and how the work of college, departments and other units affect budgets.


Budget transparency and discussions also led to a fresh partnership between the administration and the faculty in the development of the 2007-2010 budget. (~See Reorg Feature.) The original draft~ from the administration proposed realigning some faculty positions by cutting four programs: Economics, German, Theatre and Early Childhood Education. The Faculty Association objected to a piecemeal approach to realignment and requested that a more comprehensive approach be undertaken. This led to what became known on campus as “Reorg,” (link to Reorg feature) a realignment of the colleges and redefinition (per IFO-MnSCU master agreement language) of departments.


In addition to budget transparency and flexibility, several factors played into the reorganization. The possibility was set in place, in part, by Scenario Planning,~ a project set forth by President Quistgaard after the 2000 HLC Self-Study and after the Experimental Planning Process was suspended. It included a Scenario Planning Committee and Campus Conversations where faculty and staff responded to the work done by the committee. The results of the conversations were fed into the University Plan, Strategies for 2008-2013 that was then being developed. (link to Closing the Loop document)


An important element of both Scenario Planning and Reorganization conversations was the identity of the university. Bemidji State started as Bemidji Normal School in 1919. Its mission was to train teachers for public schools in northern Minnesota. Over the years it progressed in name and function to Bemidji State Teachers College, Bemidji State College and Bemidji State University. Its mission was additive and the mission statement from 1996 to 2008 noted that it had “grown into a comprehensive university....”~


The discussions and consideration of what it is that Bemidji State does and how its programs are aligned, led to a revised stated identity of the university from “comprehensive” to “an arts and sciences university with select professional programs.”


Reorganization, the identity statement, the new university plan, the new vision and mission statements and the current budget did not develop in lock-step order. Rather, they grew in what can be called an organic fashion, each one an integral aspect of an interconnected whole, each contributing to and being affected by the development of the whole. The work of the Liberal Education Task Force is an example of one element that developed in connection with the others, even though the impetus to revise Liberal Education began several years before reorganization and before the discussions about Bemidji State as a comprehensive versus an arts and sciences university.((~ to Time Line and to Lib Ed Features)) It is likely that the discussion surrounding Liberal Education goals and purposes contributed to the opening of discussions about the university’s identity and mission and that those subsequent discussions contributed to a proposal for a new Liberal Education curriculum. As discussed in the Liberal Education feature and in Chapter Three, Criterion Three, a new Liberal Education curriculum has not yet been established.


Budget

MMM

The university’s budget planning link to Budget sidebar has been similarly dynamic. The three-year 2007-2010 budget was developed primarily in response to internal changes and needs and increased the percent of dollars dedicated to direct instructional cost (based on IPEDS data). The current four-year 2010-2014 budget responds to the external threat of the national economic crisis while continuing to realign resources in support of internal, mission-driven priorities.






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2007-2010 and 2010-2014 Budget Plans Protect Faculty

The university is proud to note that in spite of the economic challenges of the day, it has not utilized retrenchment to address its budget concerns.





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The Resource Base Supports the University’s Educational Programs

The university’s resource base, as described above, adequately supports its educational programs. In spite of the state, national and international economic climate, Bemidji State remains fiscally steady. It has achieved this impressive status through insightful planning over the last ten years. Partnership endeavors, also described above, have allowed the development of innovative programs such as 360º and the four-year nursing program. College reorganization and department redefinition also contribute to curriculum revision.


In addition to traditional support of educational programs, such as faculty lines in the budget, the university supports faculty professional development and curriculum development and management by providing reassigned time for faculty directors of various committees, councils and centers, including the following:

  • Curriculum Liaison (link)

  • Liberal Education Director and Graduate Assistant (link)

  • Liberal Education Task Force Director and Graduate Assistant (200x-200x) (link to LE or to Task Force pages, if still there?)

  • People & the Environment Director (Liberal Education Category Ten) (link?)

  • Center for Professional Development Director (link)

  • Honors Director (link)

  • International Studies Director(link)

  • Writing Resource Center Director(link)

  • Assessment Coordinators (See also Assessment Feature and item three, below.~)


The university also supports departments through its Graduate Assistant program(link to GA document): fifty-five students held positions fall semester 2009. Thirty-four teach in academic departments. The remainder serve in research or administrative capacities in other areas such as Liberal Education, Academic Affairs and Graduate Studies. Graduate assistantships promotes enrollment in graduate programs and offer valuable experience to graduate students.


The fall 2007 inauguration of the Office of Student Development and Enrollment, with a new position of Vice President, provides commensurate support for student services programs and staff. [See SD&E Feature.]


The Facilities Master Plan has assured adequate and innovative support for academic programs through ongoing development of campus facilities.


By way of example, the Facilities Plan has led to the following projects:

  • American Indian Resource Center (AIRC): New building, completed 2003.

  • Bridgeman Hall: New addition and complete renovation of the existing facility.

  • Linden Hall Suites: Renovation of old-style residence hall into suite-style, state-of-the-art residence hall (Revenue Fund Bonding).

  • Physical Plant: Boiler replacement.

  • Keyless Entry System: Installed on all exterior doors on campus to enhance security.

  • Memorial Hall: Renovation for new nursing program classrooms and state-of-the-art simulation labs.

  • Sattgast Hall: New addition and renovation, completed fall 2009.

  • Roof Replacements: Ongoing, with HEAPR appropriations.


Improvements to the campus grounds include beautification projects, such as the installation of a sculpture near the central campus pergola, the pergola itself, and the relocation of a outdoor stone fireplace from a peripheral location to the waterfront near the student union. photos in the sidebar of these three features?


The Technology Master Plan~ also provides critical support to academic programming, as articulated in its mission: “...to provide the highest achievable quality of technology services and support to meet the academic and administrative needs of Bemidji State University and Northwest Technical College.”


The mission is carried out in Strategy B Enhance the Teaching and Learning Environment:

Meeting the technology needs of students and faculty is critical to the success of our respective institutions. Equal access to computer labs, classroom technology, wireless, intranet, Internet, and other resources must be provided in order to support all educational objectives. We are committed to identifying, evaluating, and acquiring, when appropriate, new technology solutions that will meet the vision, mission, strategies, and goals of Bemidji State University and Northwest Technical College. Regular discussions through scheduled meetings with lab managers or other faculty representatives will help guide the direction of computer labs and classroom technology.


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The Resource Base Supports Future Quality: A Culture of Assessment

In addition to ongoing planning, improved communication through all-campus participation in budgeting and planning, and professional development for faculty and staff, Bemidji State assures and maintains the quality of its educational programs through active assessment and evaluation at the three levels of planning: the University Plan, Master Plans, College and Department Plans. The support includes reassigned time for assessment coordinators, established and ad hoc committees, funding for projects, and the use of other resources. These are discussed below.


Since the 2000 Self-Study and the subsequent 2002 Monitoring Report, ((link to acceptance letter)) which dealt in part with assessment, consistent and meaningful evaluation has become a part of Bemidji’s campus culture [see Assessment Feature]. Support for this culture by the university’s resource base includes the following.


Support for Assessment to Assure a Quality Future

  • Planning Documents

  • Reassigned Time

    • Assessment coordinators (assist colleges and departments with five-year planning and assessment; review plans and make recommendations to deans; maintain Five-year Self-study Handbook)

    • Liberal Education director and graduate assistant

  • Committees

    • Established (ongoing)

      • University Assessment Committee (acts on assessment plans presented by departments)

      • Gaps and Trends Committee~ (reviews department and other assessments to ascertain trends and to recommend measures to fill in gaps)

    • Ad Hoc

      • Liberal Education Task Force~

      • Data (reviewed and made recommendations for annual Data Book)

  • Professional Development

    • Funding for faculty, staff and administration travel to conferences and institutes on assessment and related topics (See “Lib Ed” Feature on AAC&U General Education Institute)

    • Center for Professional Development (classroom assessment instruments, classroom observation, workshops)

  • Testing

    • National tests

      • Academic Profile (((dates of use here))

      • NSSE ((=xxx + dates))

      • CCTST (California Critical Thinking Standardized Test, used in Liberal Education assessment and program revision)

      • Standardized subject area tests (used by academic programs and departments ((examples here))

  • Academic Forums

    • Sessions on using data, assessment options, related topics

    • MnSCU cost study data

    • Dashboard and VSA



Core Component 2b: The organization’s resource base supports its educational programs and its plans for maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future.


Core Component 2c: The organization’s ongoing evaluation and assessment processes provide reliable evidence of institutional effectiveness that clearly informs strategies for continuous improvement.







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6. Assessment Systems

(Core Components 2b, 2c)


Since its 2000 Self-study and HLC site visit, Bemidji State has worked to establish a comprehensive, campus-wide culture of assessment. Progress toward this goal was noted in the HLC staff analysis (link) of the university’s 2002 Monitoring Report (link): “It is evident that a culture of assessment continues to evolve and grow” (page 2).


In 2009, assessment systems are in place at all three levels of university planning. As noted above in The Resource Base Supports Future Quality, the administration supports assessment with funding and other resources. The utilization of assessment to inform improvement follows in 7. Funding Follows Planning: Closing the Loop.


Assessment Systems, Planning Level I, University Plans

  • Inclusion in the University Plan

  • University-level assessments/testing

  • Gaps and Trends Committee

  • Institutional Research Office

  • Data resources

    • Internal Data Book

    • MnSCU Dashboard

    • VSA (alternate “dashboard”)

    • IPEDS

    • MnSCU Cost Study

    • Other??


Assessment Systems, Planning Level II Master Plans

  • Inclusion in master plans

  • Data resources ((at this level))

    • ?


Assessment Systems, Planning Level III College and Department Plans

  • Academic

    • MAP

    • Five-year reviews and handbook

    • Dimensions of Student Learning (consistency of values)

    • Data Resources

      • CSV files, course enrollments files

      • Other:

  • Administrative and University Services

    • J-Plan

    • Department five-year reviews and plans

    • Data Resources

      • ?

      • Other:


Core Component 2a: The organization realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends.


Core Component 2d: All levels of planning align with the organization’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission.



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7. Funding Follows Planning: Closing the Loop

(Core Components 2a, 2d)

Bemidji State University closes the loop on assessment planning, implementation and evaluation by aligning resources with results in support of the university’s mission. Three exemplars of closing the assessment/funding loop are discussed here: Liberal Education~, Reorganization~ and Student Development and Enrollment: The Learning Journey~. These three are also the subjects of this reports three feature stories and additional information is provided in those locations.


Elements:

  • discovery,

  • assessment,

  • evaluation, and

  • fruition


((Note-the exemplars address “access to resources-physical, financial, human- supported through budget allocations” (2d explanation), grounded in connection to the mission statement.))


These examples will be developed after the Features are written.


Exemplar 1:



Exemplar 2:



Exemplar 3:






8. Priorities for Improvement




Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.


Summary of Evidence


Core Component 2a: The organization realistically prepares for a future shaped by multiple societal and economic trends.


Core Component 2b: The organization’s resource base supports its educational programs and its plans for maintaining and strengthening their quality in the future.


Core Component 2c: The organization’s ongoing evaluation and assessment processes provide reliable evidence of institutional effectiveness that clearly informs strategies for continuous improvement.


Core Component 2d: All levels of planning align with the organization’s mission, thereby enhancing its capacity to fulfill that mission.


DRAFT—Chapter Three, Criterion Three

Bemidji State University-HLC 2010 Reaccreditation Self-Study Report


Below is a draft of Criterion Three of Bemidji State’s 2010 HLC self-study document. The self-study writing team invites you to comment freely on the content and to provide information regarding notes that are shaded in gray.


The writing team thanks the five criterion committees for their ongoing work. They are providing content and evidence for the document and are commenting on drafts. To view their work, visit the self-study web site <http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/> and click on Committees in the left column. Other information about our self-study process is also available on this site.


Please send your comments to Marty Wolf (mwolf, # 23, 2825). We would like them by November 6 so that we may consider them as we complete the document. Questions may also be addressed to Marty.


Self-Study Deadlines

Due Dates

Actions

10/16/09

Draft to campus.

11/06/09

Comments due to writing team.

12/01/09

Completed copy to Production Office.

01/22/10

Self-study due at HLC offices.

02/15/10

Mock visit.

03/22-24/10

HLC team campus visit.


READING & COMMENTING ON THE 10/16/2009 DRAFT

On weird things in the text:

Regarding your comments:

Regarding previous Criterion Committee comments:

Regarding the Core Components


HLC Writing Team

Elizabeth Dunn, HLC Co-chair (Interim Dean, College of Arts & Sciences)

Marty Wolf, HLC Faculty Co-chair (Math & Computer Science Department)

Susan Hauser, Writer (English Department)


Criterion Three

The organization provides evidence of student learning and teaching effectiveness that demonstrates it is fulfilling its educational mission.


Core Component - 3a The organization’s goals for student learning outcomes are clearly stated for each educational program and make effective assessment possible.

Core Component - 3b The organization values and supports effective teaching.

Core Component - 3c The organization creates effective learning environments.

Core Component - 3d The organization’s learning resources support student learning and effective teaching.


Organization of Criterion Three

Introduction

1. Learning and Teaching: University-level Planning, Support, Excellence (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3d)

2. Learning & Teaching Environments: Undergraduate (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)

3. Learning & Teaching Environments: Graduate (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)

4. Learning & Teaching Environments: External (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)

5. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence


Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.







Bemidji State creates, for all of its constituents, a learning-rich environment that encourages intellectual curiosity and awakens the imagination.

Introduction

In fulfillment of its educational mission, the university clearly enumerates its student learning goals and outcomes, and supports effective teaching and learning environments. This mission is fulfilled in part through professional development for faculty, innovative pedagogy and environments, regular assessment that informs curriculum and teaching, services that stay abreast of evolving needs and technologies, the allocation of resources in support of learning and teaching, and student advising.

Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
Corrections? Information?
Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


1. Learning and Teaching: Planning, Support, Excellence (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3d)

Bemidji State provides traditional and non-traditional learning opportunities for diverse audiences. Programs include master’s level and undergraduate degrees, minors, fields of emphasis, certificates and non-degree education. Settings for these offerings include on-campus, online and remote site courses, classrooms and laboratories. The offerings are supported by the university through planning and assessment, and through the allocation of resources that assure faculty, curriculum and facility excellence.


Planning Levels

Level I, Primary Mission Document

  • 2008-2013 University Plan

Level II, Foundational Mission Documents

  • Master Academic Plan (MAP)

  • Facilities Master Plan

  • Student Development and Enrollment Master Plan (J-Plan)

  • Technology Master Plan

Level III, Foundational Mission Documents

  • Colleges, Academic Departments

  • Administrative Departments







Planning for Learning and Teaching: Support for learning and teaching effectiveness is embedded in Bemidji State’s primary and foundational mission documents and in related plans, policies and processes. Further evidence and examples of this support follow in this chapter.

Level CPrimary Mission Documents: The University Plan for 2008-2013, includes the university’s mission statement: Engage, Embrace, Educate. The desired outcomes for the mission are expressed in the University Plan’s vision statement: Shaping Potential, Shaping Worlds.


The intent of the vision and mission—to educate and to make a difference—are especially carried out in Strategy A of the University Plan. The Strategic Imperative and Value Statement provide guidance for carrying out the Initiatives which are also followed by value statements.


Strategy A: Engage Students for Success in Careers, Communities and Life


Strategic Imperative: Create opportunities for student success through high quality programs and services. Value Statement: Bemidji State recognizes the value of higher education as a public good, provides student-centered access to learning, meets the needs of our diverse, rural and nontraditional students, and promotes lifelong learning.



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


Initiatives

A.1 Support students’ professional and personal development through high quality educational programs and services. Prepare students for careers, citizenship, community service, life-long learning and leadership:

through engaged, academic preparation in the Liberal Education and Honors programs and the majors;

through student-centered programs and services that assure access and success.


A.2 Promote achievement and understanding through active learning opportunities. Foster active learning pedagogies, and opportunities that support volunteerism, student research, internships, and related activities.


A.3 Encourage facilities’ planning that supports learning and community. Provide welcoming spaces on campus that promote an ambiance for learning and opportunities for interaction and community.


A.4 Strengthen measurement of student achievement. Review and revise the University Assessment Plan and the Dimensions of Student Learning, including student learning outcomes, to assure that they support the university’s vision and mission.


The University Plan further supports learning, teaching and assessment in its Goals and Measurements. As noted in the plan, Goals and Measurements evaluate achievement of the University Plan and of related items in MnSCU’s Strategic Plan. These are reported in an Accountability Dashboard that is based on a set of data that all MnSCU institutions are required to collect.


By way of example:

Strategy A Goals and Measurements

Goal One: Improvement in student learning outcomes as stated in master and strategic plans and consistent with the Dimensions of Student Learning, e.g., critical thinking, global awareness.


Goal Two: Improvement in engagement and satisfaction as reflected in measures such as NSSE, Noel-Levitz.


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


LEVEL CFoundational Mission Documents: Foundational mission documents include Level II Master Plans, Level III College and Department Plans, and Level III Administrative and University Services Plans. These are also discussed in Chapters One and Two.


Level DBemidji State’s Master Academic Plan (MAP) arises from and reflects goals and values of the university’s academic colleges and departments. It helps inform other master plans and the University Plan. It identifies six outcomes:

1. High quality programs (Provide high quality educational programs and services that support students’ professional, personal, and citizenship development.)

2. Excellent faculty (Hire and support excellent faculty.)

3. Secure future for Northern Minnesota (Help build the future of Northern Minnesota.)

4. Diverse student, staff and programming (Enhance diversity.)

5. Excellent teaching and learning environment (Support the teaching and learning environment.)

6. Financial stability (Secure financial stability through appropriate growth and program development.)


The relationship of the MAP to the University Plan, master plans, and college and department plans, including five-year academic program reviews ~5YP - MAP Table1.pdf, are discussed in Chapter Two: Criterion Two.~


Assessment Coordinator Charge

  • Meet with the chair of each department regularly each semester.

  • Provide assistance at each level of progress in the assessment process.

  • Consult with visiting evaluator of each department participating in the 5-year review process (during the visit).

  • Maintain a record/log of departmental progress. Submit report to the Dean each semester.

  • Attend assessment conferences.

  • Share conference information/expertise learned with the other assessment coordinators.

  • Meet regularly with the Assessment Committee.


Academic Assessment Committee Charge

  • Approve assessment plans.

  • Recommend on assessment funding requests.

  • Review five-year plans for connections to assessment results and recommend to VPAA.

  • Provide summary of assessment findings to University Gaps and Trends Assessment Committee annually.

  • Provide summary of what is learned from assessment results.

  • Provide summary of what changes are moving forward.

  • Summarize major findings and statement about modifications implemented to address deficiencies.

  • Summarize findings from assessment results of learning outcomes.


Membership

  • Deans (chair on rotating basis)

  • Assessment Coordinators including Liberal Education coordinator

  • VPAA – ex-officio


LEVEL CEvidence of Student Learning and Teaching Effectiveness, Five-year Plans and Reviews: The university’s commitment to providing evidence of success for its educational mission is manifest in its five-year plans and reviews. These are required of all academic and administrative/student services departments.


The assessment component of the Five-year Planning, Review and Assessment Cycle is discussed in Chapter Two, Criterion Two. ~item 6. Assessment Systems




Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825




Significant Change Feature:

Student Development & Enrollment~

Mission: We’re here for the journey, investing in our students’ success through excellent programs and services focused on learning and development. From the Learning Journey Master Plan (J-Plan).


LEVEL DStudent and University Services Plans and Reviews: Bemidji State’s administrative offices also engage in regular planning and review, including assessment. A Resource Manual with Guidelines was approved in 2000 and is currently under review. It calls for annual reports, mid-cycle reports and a five-year review and report. Additionally, the Student Development and Enrollment Master Plan (J-Plan) includes an assessment initiative: Carry out assessment in support of the Student Development & Enrollment mission and the mission of the university. Value Statement: Successful programs are guided, in part, by the analysis and use of intentionally gathered, rich, reliable, and accurate data that affirms or improves current practices; that informs decision-making, including the alignment of resources; that builds a culture of assessment; and that supports wise, creative and innovative initiatives.


By way of example, initiatives might include the following:

  • Developing program assessment plans that fit into the structure of the five-year review process and the assessment needs of the university.

  • Offering professional development opportunities that provide skill building in creating and implementing assessment plans; in assuring data integrity; and in analysis and utilization of data.


The Office of Student Development and Enrollment maintains a Wiki for tracking assessment.~ Student and university services are further discussed in Chapter Four, Criterion Four, including assessment through Communities of Practice.~

Gaps & Trends Committee Charge

  • Review annual summary assessment reports from across campus and evaluate results (academic assessment committee, student development committee, etc.)

  • Review NSSE and other institutional survey results (provided by institutional research)

  • Evaluate results annually. Report key findings and trends to faculty senate, student senate, administration, and assessment committees

  • Revise University Assessment Plan


Gaps & Trends Committee Membership

  • Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs (Convener)

  • Vice President for Academic Affairs

  • Vice President for Student Development and Enrollment

  • Vice President for Finance and Administration

  • Deans’ Representative

  • Director of Institutional Research

  • Liberal Education Representative

  • Academic Assessment Coordinator Representative

  • Graduate council Representative

  • Student Development and Enrollment Representatives (two)

  • Student Representative



LEVEL CRelated University-wide Planning

In addition to its emphasis on learning and teaching measures in its mission documents, Bemidji State monitors, evaluates and adjusts its academic planning through its University Assessment Plan, the Assessment Committee and the Gaps and Trends Committee.


LEVEL DThe University Assessment Plan was revised in 2009~ and is approved by the Vice Presidents and the Gaps and Trends Committee. It coordinates assessments that are carried out at various levels including university-wide national tests, such as NSSE and Noel-Levitz~link to IR page if improved http://www.bemidjistate.edu/offices/research_assessment/surveys/, the Academic Profile and the CCTST~, and assessments conducted through five-year reviews of academic and administrative/student services programs.


LEVEL DThe Assessment Committee meets regularly to evaluate academic department five-year plans, especially assessment plans and processes. It looks for evidence that departments are directly measuring learning and are using data appropriately to improve curriculum and teaching effectiveness.


By way of example:


LEVEL DThe Gaps and Trends Committee,~LD’s new # 3 initiated in 2009, considers various means to improve assessment at Bemidji State and to assure closure feedback loops (assessment followed by application of new knowledge and allocation of resources).


By way of example, Gaps and Trends projects include the following:

  • Assessment of the effectiveness of the content required in academic departmental self-study documents, especially regarding its usefulness to departments.

  • Software for managing and maintaining university-wide data such as TaskStream Accountability Management System~http://www.taskstream.com/pub/AMS.asp.


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included

  • NSSE data

  • Assessment results

  • University-wide assessment results



Ideas?
Comments?
Corrections? Information?

  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825



Support for Learning and Teaching: Bemidji State supports learning and teaching at multiple levels, including in its planning documents, as noted above, and by the allocation of resources at planning and operational levels.


LEVEL CSupport for Curriculum: Curriculum processes at Bemidji State are supported at several levels and include the allocation of resources:

  • Curriculum development is assisted by a Curriculum Liaison who receives three- reassigned time each semester. The liaison offers support to departments and curriculum committees.

  • The university has four Assessment Coordinators~ who work with department chairs and program directors in the evaluation of courses and programs. The coordinators each receive three- of reassigned time per semester. In addition to their coordinator duties, they serve on the Assessment Committee~, contributing to uniformity in assessment across departments and colleges.

  • The Liberal Education Committee is supported by a director who receives six- reassigned time each semester. The director also serves as assessment coordinator for the program.

  • People and the Environment, a required course in the Liberal Education program, is coordinated by a director who has three- of reassigned time per semester.

  • The Center for Professional Development also contributes to curriculum development. The CPD director receives three- of reassigned time each semester.

  • In support of the Curriculum Committee, the Catalog Office tracks proposals through the approval process. In addition, a faculty Curriculum Editor receives one credit of reassigned per semester to vet proposals for accuracy.



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825





Excellence in Learning and Teaching: Excellence in learning and teaching at the college, department and program levels is accounted for through assessments of the student population at-large, assurance of properly credentialed faculty, program distinctiveness and accreditations, and appropriate facilities.


Level C University Level Assessments: The university continually assesses for learning and teaching success. Since 2000, approximately xx academic and student surveys and studies have been conducted.~ ((See table for list and how used....))


Some comments here on things we have learned in general from these assessments? How they are originated? Are some required by MnSCU?


The assessments are funded by....? (= resources allocated)


As with academic department assessments, university-wide assessments are reviewed by the Gaps and Trends Committee ~to insure quality and integrity in the assessment process and to insure even assessment across the campus.


Center for Professional Development~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/faculty_staff/professional_development/


Handbooks & Guides

  • Faculty Handbook

  • E-Handbook for New Faculty

  • Guide for Department Chairs

  • Adjunct Faculty

  • Adjunct Supervisor Checklist


Publications

  • Metamorphosis - newsletter

  • White Paper Series


Evaluating Teaching and Classes

  • Course Evaluations

  • Department Chair Evaluations

  • Help in Documenting Teaching Effectiveness

  • Individual Teaching Consultation Service

  • Peer Observation Form


Other Resources

  • Academic Calendar

  • CPD Annual Report

  • CPD Meeting Minutes

  • Copyright Considerations

  • Discussion on FTEs

  • Five-Year Review Guidelines

  • Template for a Syllabus

  • Undergraduate Teaching Associate Forms

  • Curriculum Development at BSU


Level C Credentialed Faculty: Bemidji State assures the quality of its faculty through various means. As noted in Chapter One, Criterion One, professional development is monitored through Professional Development Plans and Reports as required by the IFO-MnSCU Master Agreement. The Master Agreement also provides annual professional development funds for faculty, allocated through academic departments. Use is regulated by the agreement and includes conference fees and other professional study and travel. The Master Agreement provides further funding through Professional Improvement Grants allocated annually.~ ((List from DEbbie Guelda))


Sabbatical leaves support faculty professional development <Sabbatical Reports - FY2001-2007>by providing focused time for scholarly and creative work.


The Center for Professional Development also supports faculty excellence through its services. These include provision of mid-term and end-of-term course evaluations, observation of and feedback for instructors, programs, forums, and a library of higher education resources. The Center’s web site offerings include white papers, a template for syllabi, instructor evaluation forms, guides for department chairs, and a handbook for adjuncts. As noted above, the university supports the CPD with three credits of reassigned time per semester for the CPD director and with an annual programming budget.


Bemidji State also participates in faculty professional development opportunities provided by the MnSCU system. The Center for Teaching and Learning regularly offers programming on learning and teaching.


Level C Program Distinctiveness and Accreditations: Bemidji State assures learning and teaching excellence through promotion of program excellence. As noted in Chapter One, Criterion One, its curriculum process~ is rigorous as are five-year program reviews, discussed below.


In addition, as noted in Chapter One, some programs are accredited by national agencies~ and some are especially distinctive in nature. Examples are noted in Chapter One.


LEVEL CCampus Resources: Statement here....and see documents on Criterion three committee web site

  • Library:

  • American Indian Resource Center

  • D2L:

  • Labs and Sattgast renovation:

  • Bridgeman:

  • Campus Facilities: Bemidji State’s facilities also support learning and teaching excellence.

XX percent of classrooms have “smart” technology.

XX computer labs: new hardware is rotated in every two to three years; software is updated each semester; security upgrades are performed as needed.

Campus grounds are appealing.

Buildings are renovated on a regular schedule

Security is xxxx.

Other?


2. Learning and Teaching Environments: Undergraduate (Core Components 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)

Undergraduate study is Bemidji State’s raison d’être. It is how we “engage, embrace and educate” students. Since 1919, when the university was chartered, undergraduate education has been its primary means for “shaping potential and shaping worlds.” Of its approximately 5,000 students, 4,500 (90 percent) study for the bachelor’s degree. As an arts and sciences university with select professional programs, Bemidji State is dedicated to learning and teaching, to inquiry and creativity, to the acquisition of knowledge and critical thinking skills, to the promotion of civic responsibility, environmental stewardship and global citizenship (the university’s signature themes).

Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
Corrections? Information?

  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825




Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


Liberal Education and Honors: During the spring 2002 semester, Bemidji State reformulated its Liberal Education offerings to accommodate the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) as mandated by the state legislature and the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system (MnSCU). The current format includes eleven topical or skill-based categories, the first ten also required in MnTC:

  1. Communication

  2. Critical Thinking

  3. Natural Science

  4. Mathematics

  5. History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences

  6. Humanities and the Arts

  7. Human Diversity in the United States

  8. Global Perspective

  9. Ethical and Civic Responsibility

  10. People and the Environment

  11. Performance and Participation

Students may choose from a number of courses in each category, except Communication which requires completion of College Writing I & II, and Critical Thinking which requires completion of the Liberal Education curriculum. Students must take a minimum number of credits in each of the remaining categories and 42 credits overall. With a few exceptions, only freshman and sophomore level courses are included, and the driving logic is to maintain flexibility, allow for student choice, provide grounding in fundamentals, and encourage exposure to a variety of disciplines. The program is administered by a campus-wide Liberal Education Committee (LEC).




Level CLiberal Education Task Force: In January of 2005, a Liberal Education Task Force was convened. It was “charged with proposing and pursuing revisions to the Liberal Education Program” (BSUFA Senate, October 2004). While the Task Force worked, the Liberal Education Committee continued to function: it acted on course submissions, student petitions, and directives from MnSCU, and carried out assessments in support of the work of the Task Force.


In the spring of 2008, the Faculty Association Senate and the Student Senate approved a “new Lib Ed” as proposed by the Task Force. However, methods for implementing the program were not always clear, and some were contested, as were some elements of the program itself. Also at issue was the relationship between the new program and the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC). In September 2009, a Faculty Association referendum of the Association’s membership overturned the Senate’s approval, with a little over one-third (plus seventeen) voting to overturn, one-third to uphold, and one-third not voting. In October 2009, the Senate imposed a moratorium on consideration of new proposals until August 2010. See the Liberal Education feature for further discussion of issues and concerns related to the Task Force and the actions of the Senate and Faculty Association members. ~



Honors Program Classes

Spring 2009

  • 1105 Influence, Power and Values: "Self-Interest and the Common Good"; Paul Kivi (Economics), Dann Siems (Biology)

  • 2107 Studies in Social Sciences & History: "History & Memory: The Reconstruction of the Past"; Marsha Driscoll (Psychology), Tom Murphy (History)

  • 4889 Integrative Seminar: "King Arthur Then and Now"; Kathy Meyer (Ethnic Studies)


Level CGoals of Liberal Education: The mission of Bemidji State’s Liberal Education Program, as stated in the university catalog, is to “create an environment where students of diverse backgrounds and abilities can acquire the knowledge, the skills, the values, and the confidence necessary for effective and responsible participation in our changing global society.” This mission is currently achieved through the mission of the Liberal Education program and the goals of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum. The goals include competencies is the eleven areas noted above. Courses are admitted to specific categories of Liberal Education based on their ability to meet the stated goals for those categories.


Level CAssessment of Liberal Education: The Liberal Education Program

Dimensions of Student Learning~, described in Chapter One.

Other assessment, CCTST, plans for....

Director is assessment coordinator


Level CSupport for the University’s Mission: The Liberal Education Program specifically supports ....

Signature themes

Strategies

MAP


Fall 2009

  • 1104 Unity and Diversity of Knowledge: "Plato and Darwin: Epistemological Revolutions"; Brendan McManus (History),  Jeff Ueland (Geography

  • 2107 Studies in Social Sciences & History: " Historical Trauma"; Ben Burgess ( Indian Studies) & Henry Flocken (Languages & Ethnic Studies)

  • 3899 Pre-Thesis Seminar - Jeff Ueland; Monday 6:00- 6:50 pm;  Hagg-Sauer 245

  • 4889 Integrative Seminar: "The Trickster"; Mark Fulton (Biology)


The Honors Program ~http://www.bemidjistate.edu/academics/departments/honors/ There are three separate sites for Honors and they are not all cross-referenced I think this URL is the best one to go to. is an alternative general education program that may be taken in lieu of the Liberal Education program. Students must meet grade point requirements for admission. An Honors Council advises a director who receives three credits of reassigned time each semester. Honors participates in the Five-year Program Planning, Review and Assessment Cycle. It emphasizes integrated learning, service learning, and the “Reacting to the Past”~ to description and data experience. The Honors Program is also discussed in Chapter Four~, under Opportunities for Students and Opportunities for Faculty, including discussion of the Honors Lecture Series by faculty.


Undergraduate Degree Programs

Six undergraduate degrees are offered through the university’s 22 academic departments:

  • Associate in Arts

  • Associate in Science

  • Bachelor of Applied Studies

  • Bachelor of Arts

  • Bachelor of Fine Arts

  • Bachelor of Science


These include 68 undergraduate majors with minors plus additional minors, specialized licenses, fields of emphasis and certificates, and pre-professional studies.



The Assessment Committee uses a review template to assure consistent reading of five-year reviews. ~http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/process/committees/criterion_three/documents/assessment%20committee%20approval%20form1.pdf


External Consultant Evaluators use a review template in responding to academic department five-year reviews. ~http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/process/committees/criterion_three/documents/External%20Consultant%20Questions1.pdf

Assessment of undergraduate departments and programs: Undergraduate departments and programs participate in the Five-year Program Planning, Review and Assessment Cycle. The cycle has three phases, each requiring a written report:

  • Year One: Five-year Plan and Assessment Plan

  • Year Three: Mid-cycle Review

  • Year Five: Self-study Report, Consultant Visit, Consultant Report.


As noted in Chapter One, academic assessments are based on the university’s Dimensions of Student Learning.~ Assessment results are evaluated and contribute to ongoing department planning. The five-year reports are reviewed by the college deans, the Assessment Committee and the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Timeliness of reviews and reports is monitored by the Assessment Coordinators and, as noted above, a schedule is maintained. LD’s new report # 2, when ready


Department self-studies include review of documents and an on-site visit by an external consultant who makes comments and recommendations that are incorporated into the next five-year cycle.

Faculty Evaluation

Faculty are evaluated through Professional Development Plans and Reports, as required by the IFO-MnSCU Master Agreement. ((provide evidence, links to examples))


Dimensions of Student Learning

Dimension 1: Intellectual Development

Outcomes:

  • Higher Order Thinking

  • Knowledge, Values, and Abilities Related to the Arts, Humanities, Sciences, and Specialized Fields of Study


Dimension 2: Understanding of Self and Relating to Others

Outcomes:

  • Values

  • Communication

  • Human Diversity

  • Self Development


Dimension 3: Participation in an Emerging Global Society

Outcomes:

  • Readiness for Careers

  • Responsible Citizenship


Assessment Exemplar

Plan, Mid-cycle Review and Self-study

Status of five-year reviews for all academic departments.~


Five-year Plan (Year One) Assessment Exemplar

Computer Science Plan ~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/process/committees/criterion_three/documents/CS%20assessment%20plan%20example1.pdf – Approved Spring 2008


Dimension 1: Intellectual Development; Outcome A: Higher Order Thinking. We will demonstrate that students from a variety of majors have acquired problem-solving strategies and the ability to apply them to new problems, even when the strategies do not necessarily lead to a solution to the problem.


Dimension 1: Intellectual Development; Outcome B: Knowledge, Values, and Abilities Related to the Arts, Humanities, Sciences and Specialized Fields of Study. We will demonstrate that our Computer Science graduates have acquired the technical skills needed to organize solutions to complex problems.


Dimension 2: Understanding of Self/Relating to Others; Outcome B: Communication and Dimension 3: Participating in an Emerging Global Society; Outcome A: Readiness for Career. Most software is developed in a team setting. This requires that practicing computer scientists relate well with others to be ready for a career. We will demonstrate that our Computer Science graduates have experienced team processes as they pertain to the development of software.


Mid-cycle Report (Year Three) Assessment Exemplar College of Arts and Sciences, Chemistry Department, 2008 mid-cycle report:


We have decided that the simple raw score of our ACS standardized exams is really not giving us much information. We have decided to convert the test to a Scantron answer sheet so that we can get an item analysis of each question and see if there are correlations. We can then identify areas that the students are weak in and try to modify/enhance our class materials in those areas.”


Self-study Report (Year Five), Assessment Exemplar

College or Arts and Sciences, English Department Five-year Self-study, 2008:


Report on curriculum changes based on assessment:

  • Results of an assessment of literature students’ abilities with literary criticism that indicate students need more work in critical theory: Literature topics courses have been put in place that incorporate the study of critical approaches to literature.

  • Growing student interest in careers in writing: An electronic writing minor and undergraduate and graduate certificates have been added to the curriculum.


Programs with national accreditation are reviewed under a separate rubric that uses a structured interview process, thus avoiding the necessity of reproducing their accreditation in the five-year review format. Accredited programs are interviewed in the first year of their accreditation (taking the place of the five-year review) and midway through their accreditation cycle. Templates are utilized for the reviews.


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
Corrections? Information?

  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825






By way of example:

Accredited Department Structured Interview (Year 1)

Department/Program: Department Chair:

Date of Interview: Assessment Coordinator:

Accredited by:

Last accreditation site visit: Next Accreditation site visit:

This interview takes the place of the 5 year department/program and assessment plan. I will be asking you information about goals and assessment activities that you intend to accomplish between now and your next accreditation visit.

  1. Since your last accreditation visit (or over the last 5 years), what program or curricular changes have been informed by what you have learned about your students/program through assessment? What is the mechanism or process whereby this information is reviewed, shared, and eventually influences department/program decisions?

  2. Going forward, how are you collecting assessment information about student learning outcomes? (ACs should try to match these with the dimensions of student learning – need one assessment of higher order thinking). Prompt for direct assessment of student learning (need at least one), and assessment of graduate program and/or distance education(if applicable).

  3. What resources are you using to accomplish assessment? (describe assessment funding for direct assessment of student learning, if relevant).

  4. What documentation can you provide as evidence of ongoing assessment and curriculum development? (attach documents)


Accredited Department Structured Interview (Mid cycle)

Department/Program: Department Chair:

Date of Interview: Assessment Coordinator:

Accredited by:

Last accreditation site visit: Next Accreditation site visit:

This interview takes the place of the mid cycle report. I will be asking you to provide an update about your assessment activities.


  1. What is your progress in collecting assessment information about student learning outcomes? (refer back to year 1 interview. Prompt for direct assessment, assessment of grad program, and/or distance education if relevant.)

  2. What have you learned about your students from your assessment results so far and what changes (if any) has the department made based on the results?

  3. What challenges (anticipated or unanticipated) have occurred related to assessment and how have you dealt with them?

  4. What changes (if any) have you made in assessing student learning?

  5. What data can you provide as evidence of ongoing assessment and curriculum development? (attach documents)



Concurrent High School Enrollment 2005-2009


High Schools

  • Voyageurs HS

  • Bemidji HS

  • Park Rapids Area HS

  • Clearbrook-Gonvick HS


Courses Offered

  • ENGL 1101 College Writing I

  • ENGL 1102 College Writing II

  • ENGL 2355 American Literature

  • PHYS 2101 Physics I

  • MATH 1170 College Algebra

  • MATH 1107 Introduction to Mathematical Sciences

  • BUAD 1100 Introduction to Business

  • CHEM 1111 General Chemistry I


Opportunities for Undergraduate Students: Bemidji State supports student learning by offering flexible program options, varied teaching pedagogies, and co-curricular education.


LEVEL CFlexible program and course options: Bemidji State recognizes the value of flexible education options for today’s students. Courses are delivered in traditional classrooms and through distance learning~ (remote site, online, blended classroom and online, self-study packets). High school students may take Bemidji State classes on-campus or in their high school classrooms (concurrent enrollment~). The university also collaborates with other post-secondary institutions in the offering of courses and programs~.


LEVEL DDistance Learning Courses and Programs: Bemidji State offers individual courses through Distance Learning. These may be used to fulfill requirements for Liberal Education and for on-campus programs. More than 240 individual courses~ by twenty-three departments were offered fall 2009. Distance Learning courses are offered online, at remote sites, and in self-study packets. Self-study (hard copy) packets continue to serve students who do not have ready access to online technology.


Bemidji State also offers select online degree programs through Distance Learning including Professional Education, Psychology, Business Administration, Technological Studies, Criminal Justice and Nursing. ~


LEVEL DSummer School: During the summer term, courses are available on-campus and through Distance Learning. Formats vary from full session schedules to intensified, short-term workshops.




LEVEL DPost-secondary Education Options (PSEO) for high school students: Area students who have achieved a certain grade point average or rank in class and wish to begin college before they graduate from high school may take advantage of two programs at Bemidji State: they may attend classes on the Bemidji State campus or they may attend Bemidji State classes at their high school location (concurrent enrollment) if their school participates in the program.


By way of example:

Year/Semester

Courses

Headcount

Credits

2006 Fall

1

15

30

2006 Spring

1

13

39

2007 Fall

1

23

115

2007 Spring

2

57

285

2008 Fall

7

122

426

2008 Spring

8

120

459

2009 Fall

9

154

574

2009 Spring

7

127

475

2010 Fall

10

209

788

Total


840

3191


Other opportunities for high school students are discussed in Chapter Five, Criterion Five. ~relationships with high schools section


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


LEVEL DCollaborations with Institutions

Bemidji State collaborates with other Minnesota campuses in offering academic degrees to distance learning students.


By way of example:


Bemidji State also maintains program articulations with numerous community and technical colleges, assuring seamless transfer for students. A MnSCU template is used for the agreements. ~Articulation Template from Crystal


By way of example:

((~ there are a couple of queries out on this, I think. List of articulations for programs—vs. general articulations for courses, but maybe reference those, too.))



Reacting to the Past (RTTP) consists of elaborate games, set in the past, in which students are assigned roles informed by classic texts in the history of ideas. Class sessions are run entirely by students; instructors advise and guide students and grade their oral and written work. It seeks to draw students into the past, promote engagement with big ideas, and improve intellectual and academic skills.  Pioneered by Barnard College in 1996, the project is supported by a consortium of colleges and universities.


Bemidji State’s own Reacting to the Past Game: Darwin, the Copley Medal, and Naturalism, 1862-1864.

LEVEL DClassroom Pedagogies: Classroom pedagogies at Bemidji State range from traditional to innovative. Traditional strategies include lecture, discussion, workshop/studio and lab.


By way of example:

  • Interdisciplinary teaching in People and the Environment classes using lecture and breakout sections.

  • Team teaching in Honors courses.

  • Blended courses using multiple methodologies, including D2L.

  • Reacting to the Past: An innovative classroom pedagogy (see left), required for Honors students.


Innovative pedagogies are described in Metamorphosis, a newsletter of the Center for Professional Development and occasionally in Horizons, the university’s alumni magazine.


By way of example:

  • The Evolving Curriculum: Collaborative Problem-Solving in an Online World, Metamorphosis 2008 Volume XXIII, Issue I ~http://www.bemidjistate.edu/faculty_staff/professional_development/metamenu.html

  • Darwin article in Horizons ~



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


LEVEL CCo-curricular Education: Co-curricular learning opportunities for students include participation in student government and organizations, residential life programs, university committees, student union programming, health service initiatives, on-campus jobs and related activities. Qualified students may also experience the challenges and rewards of college teaching by working with faculty as Teaching Associates.


By way of example:

  • Student Senate: Officers and representatives learn leadership skills and experience governance.

  • FYRE, First Year Residential Experience: a learning and living community for freshmen and a career experience opportunity for upper class students, who return to the program to serve as Resident Assistants.

  • PAA, Peer Academic Assistant: Provide academic support to residents in the First Year Residential Experience program.

  • Lifestyle Educators: Student peer educators learn leadership skills and are trained to give accurate and current health information to their peers.

  • Hobson Union Programming Board (HUPB) organizes social and cultural programs for the campus community.

  • On-campus employment: Work Study and Regular Payroll positions are available in most areas of the university including academic and administrative departments, the library, grounds and maintenance, food services.

  • Undergraduate Teaching Associate Program (UTAP)

  • Sustainability


Student life is discussed further in Chapter Four: Criterion Four~.


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


Opportunities for Faculty

Bemidji State supports teaching, research and creative opportunities for faculty. Faculty engagement in such activities contributes to an active learning environment.


LEVEL C

Curriculum Development: The Center for Professional Development and the Curriculum Liaison~ provide support for curriculum development. As noted above, the university supports both with reassigned time for directors.


The MnSCU system also provides support through the Center for Learning and Teaching.


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825



LEVEL C

Honors Lectures: The Honors Program lecture series promotes scholarly discourse among the faculty and cultivates new intellectual interests among students. As noted above, the Honors Program director receives three of reassigned time per semester.


LEVEL C

Committee and Council Service: Faculty are encouraged to serve on university committees and councils, including the following:

  • Examples of Committees (BSU Faculty Association): Curriculum, Liberal Education, Teacher Education, Graduate, Academic Affairs, Student Services, Government Relations, Professional Improvement Grants, Academic Computing.

  • Examples of Councils and Centers: Honors, Professional Development, International Studies, Women’s Studies.


LEVEL C

Collaborations with Students: Faculty at Bemidji State recognize the value of faculty-student collaborations in research, creative work and related projects. Collaborations provide students with the opportunity to work closely with mentors and to experience hands-on, professional work ((more here – suggestions appreciated)). Faculty benefit in their increased understanding of student learning and ((More here...suggestions appreciated.))


By way of example:


Faculty-student collaborations are also discussed in Chapter Four, Criterion Four. ~


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825



LEVEL C

Collaborations with Colleagues: Faculty are encouraged to collaborate with each other on learning, teaching and professional development.


By way of example:

  • The Office of Academic Affairs sent a Liberal Education Committee team to an AAC&U General Education Institute. See “Liberal Education” feature story.

  • Faculty from diverse disciplines are invited to teach breakout sections and to participate in large-group discussions in People and the Environment courses (Liberal Education).

  • Faculty team teach in Honors and other programs.

  • It is common for faculty to collaborate on grant writing and administration.

    By way of example, the following grants were awarded to Bemidji State in Fiscal Year 2008 (2007-2008 Data Book):

    • Student Support Services

    • Nurse Education Practice and Retention

    • Post-secondary Vocational Education Training

    • Small Business Development Center

    • Title VI-E BWS Child Welfare Training

    • Restoration of Indian Lake

    • NASA Space Grant

    • Data in Mathematics

    • Minnesota Water Resources Climate Change

    • Engineering Technology Center


LEVEL C

Course and Program Delivery Options: Faculty are encouraged to utilize alternative course and program delivery options such as those discussed above, including online, summer, remote site and blended format.



Programs Offering Graduate Degrees

  • Biology

  • Counseling Psychology

  • English

  • Environmental Studies

  • Mathematics

  • Professional Education

  • Science

  • Sport Studies

  • Technological Studies


Graduate Degrees through Distance Learning

  • Master of Science in Education

  • Master of Education

  • Master of Science-Industrial Technology

  • Master of Science-Technology/Career and Technical Education


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included

  • GA list

  • Grants to grad students

  • Awards for grad students

  • Other


Ideas?
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Corrections? Information?

  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825



3. Learning and Teaching Environments: Graduate

(Core Components 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d)


Graduate study at Bemidji State offers opportunities for students advanced preparation in a chosen field, providing them with professional level knowledge and credentials. Graduate students are prepared to enter careers, to advance in their current careers, and to transition to doctoral programs.


Faculty are admitted to the graduate faculty based on stated criteria, department approval, and approval of the college dean, the graduate dean and the vice president for academic affairs. Terms run for seven years. Admission of associate graduate faculty is also based on stated criteria and approvals. Terms run for three years.


A Graduate Studies Committee makes recommendations on curriculum and program proposals and advises the graduate dean. Members of the committee belong to the graduate faculty and are elected for service by graduate programs.


Graduate Degrees, Licensures and Certificates: Five master’s degrees are offered by nine of Bemidji State’s 22 academic departments:

  • Master of Arts

  • Master of Science

  • Master of Education

  • Master of Special Education

  • Master of Science (Education)


Specialized licensures (non-degree) are offered in Career and Technical Education, Preprimary Specialty, Reading and Special Education. Certificates (non-degree) are offered in Electronic Writing and Online Teaching.


Programs are offered on-campus at Bemidji State and through Distance Learning


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


Assessment of graduate programs: Graduate programs are assessed on the five-year cycle of the Five-year Academic Program, Review and Assessment plan. The five-year plan is described above, in undergraduate program review. As with undergraduate programs, graduate program assessment results are evaluated and inform curriculum revision. Graduate Studies, including program assessment, is an identified Priority for Improvement.~


Graduate programs are also assessed indirectly by the Graduate Office utilizing exit evaluations conducted at the end of the thesis oral defense. ((are these results available on the web??))


Opportunities for Graduate Students:

Graduate Assistantships: The university supports graduate students through fifty-four graduate assistantships offered annually through the three colleges and seven administrative and support offices.~((new Msword doc for GA listings)) Graduate assistants teach, coach, conduct research and assist with administrative duties. They receive an annual stipend of $8,500.00 and twelve of tuition waiver. More here—suggestions appreciated.))


Opportunities for Graduate Faculty: Members of the graduate faculty chair and serve as committee members on thesis committees. They may also serve as Graduate Representatives for the Graduate Studies Office at thesis defenses.

More here—suggestions appreciated.))



4. Learning and Teaching Environments: External

(Core Components 3a, 3c)

Programs: Distance Learning, etc. As noted above, several non-degree programs (licenses and certificates) are offered at the graduate level.


Assessment: Distance Learning programs are assessed on a five-year cycle through department planning. An Assessment Coordinator assists with these plans.

More here—suggestions appreciated.))


Programs for external constituents are discussed further in Chapter Five, Criterion Five.~


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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  • Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


5. Priorities for Improvement

Civic Engagement

Graduate Studies

Professional Education





Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.


Summary of Evidence


Criterion Three

The organization provides evidence of student learning and teaching effectiveness that demonstrates it is fulfilling its educational mission.


Core Component - 3a The organization’s goals for student learning outcomes are clearly stated for each educational program and make effective assessment possible.


Core Component - 3b The organization values and supports effective teaching.


Core Component - 3c The organization creates effective learning environments.


Core Component - 3d The organization’s learning resources support student learning and effective teaching.

DRAFT—Chapter Four, Criterion Four

Bemidji State University-HLC 2010 Reaccreditation Self-Study Report


Below is a draft of Criterion Four of Bemidji State’s 2010 HLC self-study document. The self-study writing team invites you to comment freely on the content and to provide information regarding notes that are shaded in gray.


The writing team thanks the five criterion committees for their ongoing work. They are providing content and evidence for the document and are commenting on drafts. To view their work, visit the self-study web site <http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/> and click on Committees in the left column. Other information about our self-study process is also available on this site.


Please send your comments to Marty Wolf (mwolf, # 23, 2825). We would like them by November 6 so that we may consider them as we complete the document. Questions may also be addressed to Marty.


Self-Study Deadlines

Due Dates

Actions

10/16/09

Draft to campus.

11/06/09

Comments due to writing team.

12/01/09

Completed copy to Production Office.

01/22/10

Self-study due at HLC offices.

02/15/10

Mock visit.

03/22-24/10

HLC team campus visit.


READING & COMMENTING ON THE 10/16/2009 DRAFT

On weird things in the text:

Regarding your comments:

Regarding previous Criterion Committee comments:

Regarding the Core Components


HLC Writing Team

Elizabeth Dunn, HLC Co-chair (Interim Dean, College of Arts & Sciences)

Marty Wolf, HLC Faculty Co-chair (Math & Computer Science Department)

Susan Hauser, Writer (English Department)

Shaping Potential/Shaping Worlds

Story here...


Criterion Four: Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge

The organization promotes a life of learning for its faculty, administration, staff, and students by fostering and supporting inquiry, creativity, practice, and social responsibility in ways consistent with its mission.



Organization of Chapter Four

Introduction

  1. University Commitment (4a, 4c, 4d)

  2. Faculty and staff (4a, 4c)

  3. The Learning Journey: Student Development and Enrollment (4b, 4c, 4d)

  4. Liberal Education (4b, 4c, 4d)

  5. Undergraduate Study (4a, 4b, 4c)

  6. Graduate Study (4a, 4b, 4c)

  7. External Communities of Interest (4b)

  8. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence


Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.




Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
Corrections? Information?
Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


Introduction

Bemidji State University is unequivocal in its commitment to the acquisition, discovery and application of knowledge. This commitment is evident in its primary and foundational mission documents and in its actions, which are mission-motivated. The university promotes lifelong learning for all of its constituents, internal and external; promotes and models the values of an educated life; and supports, through its actions, an informed and active citizenry.


Primary Mission Document, The University Plan

  • Vision

  • Mission

  • Signature themes (values)

  • SCOT analysis

  • Strategies


Foundational Mission Documents

  • Master Plans

  • College and Department Plans

  • Administrative and University Services Department Plans


  • Core Component 4a The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning.

  • Core Component 4c The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society.

  • Core Component 4d The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly.



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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1. University Commitment (4a, 4c, 4d)

The university demonstrates and models its commitment to higher education in its mission documents, its policies and procedures and its budget, and by attending to the societal currency and relevancy of its programs.

Mission Documents: As noted in Chapter One, the University Plan promotes and supports excellence in higher education. That excellence is defined, in part, by the university’s vision and mission~, by its signature themes~ and by the Strategies for 2008-2013~.


By way of example:


Strategy A: Engage Students for Success in Careers, Communities and Life

Strategic Imperative: Create opportunities for student success through high quality programs and services. Bemidji State recognizes the value of higher education as a public good, provides student-centered access to learning, meets the needs of our diverse, rural and nontraditional students, and promotes lifelong learning.


Also as noted in Chapter One, the spirit and letter of the primary mission documents permeates the foundational documents, including master plans and college plans.


By way of example:

Master Academic Plan (MAP):

  • [The] Master Academic Plan coordinates and further develops those portions of the University Plan that are uniquely academic.

  • The Master Academic Plan provides a flexible overall framework for the development of specific college and department plans and for academic initiatives that reflect those plans. In this way, the MAP guides academic development at the university and connects current planning efforts to those that have gone before....


Effective 2008-2009, the Bemidji State reorganized its colleges~. The new college visions and missions clearly embrace the university’s vision and mission as well as reflect the personality of each college and its departments:


College of Arts and Sciences (CAS)

  • Vision: As a college that values intellectual curiosity, creativity, and diversity, we foster the transformation of lives and societies through the power of an engaged, integrative education.

  • Mission: We shape passion for knowledge, meaning, and creativity.


College of Health Sciences and Human Ecology (HSHE)

  • Vision: The College of Health Sciences and Human Ecology embraces a deep respect for the individual, a holistic approach to education, dedication to science and service, and a commitment to the betterment of communities.

  • Mission: To excel in education, research, and service.


College of Business, Technology and Communication (CBTC)

  • Vision: Student-centered preparation for professional leadership in a dynamic, interconnected world.

  • Mission: Engaging students for the professional world.


As noted in Chapter One, the MAP informs the Facilities Master Plan, Technology Master Plan and Student Enrollment and Development Master Plan, thus carrying forward the university’s mission.


By way of example:

J-Plan: The Learning Journey, Student Development and Enrollment, 2008-2013~

Mission: We’re here for the journey, investing in our students’ success through excellent programs and services focused on learning and development.


Strategies to Achieve the Mission

Strategy 6: Promote and support staff professional development. Hallmarks of a strong, unified and successful staff include collaboration and collegiality; scholarship, participation in conferences and knowledge of professional literature; the framing of work in a common language of learning; and the modeling of learning and growth.

====


Policies and Procedures Handbooks

Student Handbook~

Faculty Handbook~

Adjunct Faculty Handbook~

??Staff Handbook~

??Other handbooks??



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
Corrections? Information?
Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


Policies and Procedures: In its policies and procedures, the university both promotes and models values and behaviors that address integrity in behavior and actions, including research, teaching and learning.


By way of example:

Integrity Policies

  • Human Subjects in Research: Bemidji State protects individuals’ rights through Policies and Procedures for the Use of Human Subjects in Research.~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/academics/graduate_studies/gradForms/humanSubjects.php

  • Intellectual Property Rights: The university subscribes to MnSCU system Intellectual Property Rights policies and procedures.~http://intellectualproperty.mnscu.edu/

  • Privacy Rights: Bemidji State values and protects privacy rights through MnSCU system policies~ http://www.mnscu.edu/board/policy/523.html and its own policies, including the following:

    • Online~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/about/privacy/

    • Registration~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/offices/records_registration/policies_procedures/

    • Academic~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/students/handbook/policies/

    • Student Code of Conduct~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/students/handbook/conduct/

    • Right to Know~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/students/handbook/right_to_know/

    • Responsible Men Responsible Women~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/students/rmrw/

    • ???OTHERS??







Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
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Budget: Through its budget alignments and allocations, Bemidji State supports the acquisition, discovery and application of knowledge. Priorities for the budget are set in the University Plan:


Strategy D: Optimize Resources to Achieve the University’s Vision and Mission

Strategic Imperative: Effectively manage and increase enrollment and resources in support of the university’s vision and mission. Bemidji State recognizes and honors the role of the university in the stewardship of its resources and the importance of accountability.


D.2 Manage revenues in support of educational programs and services. Support student success through stewardship of revenue streams including tuition and fees, scholarships, state allocation, and external fundraising.


D.3 Create institutional capacity through improvement in efficiencies. Support student success through efficiencies and improved utilization of internal financial resources.


D.4 Through intentional analysis, utilize data to inform decision-making in support of the university’s vision and mission. Improve generation and allocation of resources through a process of discovery, identification, collection and interpretation of data.


D.5 Maintain financial strength through priority program growth and development. Expand capacity for existing programs with high regional or national demand while identifying new programs and markets that have the potential to strengthen enrollment.


In the spirit of that commitment, and utilizing data sources such as IPEDS, the university has moved from one-year, budget plans that addressed the situation of the moment to forward-thinking, longer-term planning. As noted in Chapter Two, a three-year, 2007-2010 budget responded primarily to internal pressures and increased the percent of the budget dedicated to direct instructional costs. The current four-year, 2010-2014 budget responds primarily to external economic pressures. It was constructed prior to the fall 2008 state and national financial crisis. As a result of that planning, the university has been in a good position to weather the economic storm that included an additional state of Minnesota unallocation in 2009. For example, the university has not had to resort to faculty retrenchment.


Part of the success of the budgets can be attributed to transparency in the budget process, including frequent budget forums open to the campus, and budget statements by the president of the university.


By way of example:

  • Office of the President http://www.bemidjistate.edu/offices/president/budget/

  • Budget Forums PowerPoints~

  • 3- and 4-year budget documents


As noted in Chapter Three, the university also supports learning through reassigned time for the Directors of Liberal Education~, Honors~, the Center for Professional Development~, People and the Environment~, and other positions related to curriculum, learning and teaching.


((Other examples here of allocation of resources for the acquisition of knowledge, etc.??))


Bemidji State Wireless Services for Students, Faculty, Staff ~http://www.bemidjistate.edu/its/wireless/index.htm


Technology Services for Students Including Email and Residence Halls ~http://www.bemidjistate.edu/its/students/index.htm


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
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Information Technology: ~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/its/ Bemidji State is nationally recognized for moving campus-wide to the dual Macintosh and Windows platform, allowing maximum flexibility for software and hardware choice. It also maintains current-standard software across the university, including programs in manufacturing, architecture, graphic and media design. Software excellence and cross-platform coordination among programs helps assure that students have the opportunity to enter the workforce with competitive skills and knowledge.


Other information technology support includes a laptop program for faculty (new hardware every few years), open and specialized computer laboratories, technical support and related services.


By way of example:

Manufacturing

219 machines

Athletics

87 machines

Music

23 machines

Graphic & Media Design

272 Machines

CCNA

CNC Mill

Robotics

AutoCad

Mastercam

Automation Studio

ProE Wildfire

Logic 7

Visible Analyst

Fitnessgram

Diet Analysis+

Finale

Practica Musica

Adobe Production Master Suite

Final Cut Pro Studio

Soundtrack Pro

SoundStudio 3.5

iLife

Solidworks

FormZ

3D Studio Max

iWork


Mathematics & Computer Information Science 350 machines

Geographic Systems

268 machines

Accounting

157 machines

Maple

SPSS

Stella

Mathematica

Minitab

COBOL

Visual Studio

Python

MicroFocus

ProSeries

ArcGIS

ArcView

Google Earth

Taxwise

GreatPlains Dynamics

ProSeries


The university also supports students knowledge and understanding of information technology through its growing use of web-enhanced courses using D2L. ~ By way of example: (((INFO HERE FROM LYNN JOHNSON)) ~



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
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Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825
















Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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External Guidance and Confirmation: Bemidji State recognizes that today’s academy does not function in isolation from the larger world. This understanding is especially confirmed in its vision statement: “Shaping Potential, Shaping Worlds,” and in its Strategies for 2008-2013:


Strategy B: Promote Vital Communities through Involvement

Strategic Imperative: Support and promote community vitality through Bemidji State’s commitments within our local, regional, national and world spheres. Bemidji State values the supportive relationships between the university and its communities.


Bemidji State further recognizes that its relationship with external communities is mutual: that influence, support and benefits flow in both directions.


To assure that its mission-motivated actions are responsive to the realities of the larger world, the university solicits, accepts and acts on commentary and feedback in multiple forms.


By way of example:

  • Five-year academic program reviews include visits and recommendations by external consultants~. http://www.bemidjistate.edu/academics/affairs/program_review.cfm

  • Five-year Student/University Services reviews recommend external consult reviews~. http://www.bemidjistate.edu/academics/affairs/program_review.cfm

  • As noted in Chapter One, seven departments hold outside accreditation for their programs.~

  • Five-year academic reviews include alumni surveys, standardized national exams, internship evaluations and employer surveys.~((to Laurie’s document “Assessment Plans Spreadsheet.pdf”))

  • The following departments have program advisory boards: List + Links~

  • As noted in Chapter Five, the American Indian Resource Center has feedback relationships with American Indian Reservations.~

  • Also as noted in Chapter Five, Bemidji State has feedback relationships with its communities of interest. ~

  • Core Component 4a The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning.

  • Core Component 4c The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society.













Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825


2. Faculty and staff (4a, 4c)

Through professional development activities, faculty and staff at Bemidji State engage in, embrace and model lifelong learning. As noted in Chapter Three, support for individual activities includes the following:

  • Professional Development Funds~

  • Professional Improvement Grants~

  • Sabbatical leaves~ ((Link to reports))


The university also supports professional development through programs such as the following:

  • Center for Professional Development~

  • Honors Program (faculty lecture series)~

  • EuroSpring and other international travel (faculty directors)~ http://www.bemidjistate.edu/students/international/

  • ((Others here that support faculty professional activities))

Professional development activities include research, creative work, study, publishing and travel. These activities are developed and reported in Professional Development Plans and Reports.


By way of example, faculty and staff report the following professional development activities:

  • Faculty

    • Sabbatical Reports FY 2001-2007~

    • Professional Improvement Grant Recipient Topics~

    • Publications, presentations at conferences, related activities, as reported in faculty vitae~

  • Staff

    • Examples here ((We’re working on it!)

    • BSU Insider??


The university also recognizes faculty and staff development and accomplishments through publication in the BSU Insider.

Student Development & Enrollment Mission

We’re here for the journey, investing in our students’ success through excellent programs and services focused on learning and development.




  • Core Component 4b The organization demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs.

  • Core Component 4c The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society.

  • Core Component 4d The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly.


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
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University Services Support the Academic Journey

  • A.C. Clark Library

  • Admissions Office

  • Advising Success Center

  • American Indian Resource Center

  • Campus Childcare

  • Career Services

  • Computer Labs

  • Disabilities Services

  • Financial Aid Office

  • Health and Counseling Center

  • Pier 9

  • Records Office

  • Responsible Men Responsible Women

  • Student Development and Enrollment

  • Trio SSS

  • University Bookstore

  • Upward Bound

  • Veterans Services


Student Life Opportunities Support the Academic Journey

  • Athletics

  • Campus Dining

  • Campus Security

  • First-year Experience

  • Hobson Union

  • Intramural Athletics

  • Northern Student Newspaper

  • Outdoor Programming Center

  • Recreation Center

  • Residential Life/Housing

  • Student Organizations

  • Student Senate


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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ADD Cedar apts, linden, res halls in general (support)


3. The Learning Journey: Student Development and Enrollment (4b, 4c, 4d)

One of the most significant changes for Bemidji State since the 2000 Self-study is the opening of the Office of Student Development and Enrollment which is led by a vice president. While most of its constituent offices and programs had been operational for many years, the office brought a new focus to their purpose and new energy to their commitment.


Through Student Development and Enrollment, Bemidji State promotes students’ academic journeys and provides opportunities for co-curricular experiences and development. As noted in the Student Development and Enrollment Master Plan (the Learning Journey Plan, or J-Plan):


From the Preface:

With its 2008 mission statement, Bemidji State University turns its attention toward “a future that can only be imagined” and the recognition that a primary responsibility of higher education today is to prepare students not only for immediate careers, rich personal lives and citizenship, but for the entire arc of their life journeys. The Student Development & Enrollment Master Plan acknowledges the breadth and depth of that challenge, and guides programs, services and staff in their efforts to meet the challenges of a thousand unpredictable tomorrows.



See the Learning Journey (J-Plan) Feature Story~ for further information on the evolution of the Office of Student Development and Enrollment.


Planning Document Support for the Learning Journey: As noted above, the J-Plan is based on a commitment to learning and development. That commitment is carried out especially through the first four Strategies to Achieve the Mission:


  1. Support and promote students’ learning.

  2. Support and promote students’ personal well-being.

  3. Challenge and support students as they navigate their journey.

  4. Ensure ease of access to the university and to campus services and programs.


Support for the Academic Journey: Support for students’ academic journeys include advising, first-year programs, and tutoring and related services.


Level CAdvising Success Center (ASC): In consultation with faculty advisors, the Advising Success Center provides comprehensive information to students regarding their academic programs. See the Learning Journey Feature Story for information on the development of ASC and the university’s support for the office.


Level CFirst-year Programs: The university supports two programs taught by faculty that especially promote academic and personal success for first-year students:

  • First-year Experience (FYE) Seminars~ introduces students to services that help them with the transition to college learning and life.

  • First-year Residence Experience (FYRE)~ helps students who live in the residence halls transition into college life, both academic and residential.


Level CAcademic Support through Tutoring: The university offers tutoring support for students.


By way of example:



Level CLibrary Services TEXT HERE


Support for Co-curricular Experiences and Development: Bemidji State recognizes that students who come to the university have diverse backgrounds and needs. Student services range from advising, as noted above, to specialized services such as on-campus childcare, counseling, veterans services and disabilities services. Opportunities include participation in student programs and organizations.


Level CStudent Services Offices: Students are assisted in their personal and academic journeys by campus offices such as the Advising Success Center, Career Services, the Counseling Center and Health Services. (See list and links in side panel). The personnel in these offices fulfill strategies one through four in the J-Plan:


  1. Support and promote students’ learning. Self-confidence, self-reliance and responsibility for self lie close to the heart of academic success.

  2. Support and promote students’ personal well-being. Personal wellness has many facets, including physical competence, emotional intelligence, a sense of geographic place, spirituality, life-style balance, and a positive sense of self and well-being.

  3. Challenge and support, i.e., empower, students as they navigate their journey. The constant for the future is change. In addition to being prepared for careers and graduate study, students who are ready for the future will have knowledge and skills that prepare them to be effective in team work, to think critically and to discern values.

  4. Ensure ease of access to the university and to campus services and programs. By leading, initiating, intervening, following through, reaching out and networking, Student Development & Enrollment advocates - makes things happen - for students.


Level CStudent Opportunities: Student participation in campus organizations and processes contributes to their personal and academic growth and to the development of lifelong learning skills.


By way of example:

  • Student Senate, including service on university committees.

  • Student Organizations.

  • President’s Commission ~ to document

  • Service on committees such as administrative searches and department advisory boards.

  • Core Component 4b The organization demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs.

  • Core Component 4c The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society.

  • Core Component 4d The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly.




Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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4. Liberal Education (General Education) (4b, 4c, 4d)

As noted in Chapter Two, Bemidji State recently reorganized its colleges and reviewed its Liberal Education program. These efforts evolved cooperatively, both contributing to the redefinition of Bemidji State from a comprehensive university to an arts and sciences university with select professional programs.~ ((In chapter two, link to this phrase: “Reorganization, the identity statement”)) As noted in the Liberal Education Feature Story~, the proposal to revise the Liberal Education curriculum was informed by extensive assessment and in collaboration with faculty, staff and administration. The Liberal Education Feature Story also relates the university’s allocation of resources in support of the Liberal Education program.


The current Liberal Education program features breadth of study across the arts and sciences. While the Task Force was at work, assessment activities concentrated on national critical thinking standards. Assessment of the current program is based on Minnesota Transfer Curriculum goals and competencies. A schedule for current review is under development and will be monitored by the Liberal Education Committee and the Director who also serves as Liberal Education Assessment Coordinator. The position carries six credits of reassigned time each semester.


  • Core Component 4a The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning.

  • Core Component 4b The organization demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs.

  • Core Component 4c The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society.




Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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5. Undergraduate Study (4a, 4b, 4c)

As noted in Chapter Three, undergraduate study is Bemidji State’s raison d’etre.~ The university encourages and supports undergraduate students by recognizing their successes and by offering programming that reaches beyond the classroom.


Recognition for Undergraduate Student Learning: Bemidji State recognizes and supports undergraduate student scholarship and creative accomplishments.


By way of example:


Acquiring Knowledge Outside the Undergraduate Classroom: The university encourages students to explore learning, creativity, innovation and knowledge beyond their majors and related programs.


By way of example:


Preparing for Living in a Global, Multicultural and Diverse Society: Bemidji State is committed to preparing students for careers and living in a global, multicultural and diverse society. This commitment is expressed in its primary mission documents, including its Signature Themes, and in its support of dedicated academic and student services programs such as the following:



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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6. Graduate Study (4a, 4b 4,c)

Info from cmte 4’s school of grad studies – though some might belong in ch 3.


As noted in Chapter Three~, graduate study at Bemidji State offers opportunities for students to specialize in a field and obtain professional level knowledge and credentials. The university supports graduate students by recognizing their successes and by offering opportunities that reach beyond the classroom.


Recognition for Graduate Student Learning: Bemidji State recognizes and supports the academic success of its graduate students.


By way of example:



Acquiring Knowledge Outside the Graduate Classroom: The university promotes and supports opportunities for graduate students outside the classroom. By way of example:

  • Collaborations with faculty on research, etc.?

  • ((More here)) ((Include ENGL publications as above in u-grad?))


Preparing for Living in a Global, Multicultural and Diverse Society: As noted above in Undergraduate Study, Bemidji State is committed to preparing students for careers and living in a global, multicultural and diverse society. This commitment is expressed in its primary mission documents, including its Signature Themes, and in its support of dedicated academic and student services programs such as the following:


  • Core Component 4d The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly.


7. External Communities of Interest (4b)

ADD TEXT HERE AND ALSO Refer to Chapter Five


((On CRI, Custom College, etc. Cooperation with tribal colleges, cc’s, tc’s. etc.))




8. Priorities for Improvement





Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.


Criterion Four: Acquisition, Discovery, and Application of Knowledge

Summary of Evidence


Core Component 4a The organization demonstrates, through the actions of its board, administrators, students, faculty, and staff, that it values a life of learning.


Core Component 4b The organization demonstrates that acquisition of a breadth of knowledge and skills and the exercise of intellectual inquiry are integral to its educational programs.


Core Component 4c The organization assesses the usefulness of its curricula to students who will live and work in a global, diverse, and technological society.


Core Component 4d The organization provides support to ensure that faculty, students, and staff acquire, discover, and apply knowledge responsibly.

DRAFT—Chapter Five, Criterion Five

Bemidji State University-HLC 2010 Reaccreditation Self-Study Report


Below is a draft of Criterion Five of Bemidji State’s 2010 HLC self-study document. The self-study writing team invites you to comment freely on the content and to provide information regarding notes that are shaded in gray.


The writing team thanks the five criterion committees for their ongoing work. They are providing content and evidence for the document and are commenting on drafts. To view their work, visit the self-study web site <http://www.bemidjistate.edu/hlc/> and click on Committees in the left column. Other information about our self-study process is also available on this site.


Please send your comments to Marty Wolf (mwolf, # 23, 2825). We would like them by November 6 so that we may consider them as we complete the document. Questions may also be addressed to Marty.


Self-Study Deadlines

Due Dates

Actions

10/16/09

Draft to campus.

11/06/09

Comments due to writing team.

12/01/09

Completed copy to Production Office.

01/22/10

Self-study due at HLC offices.

02/15/10

Mock visit.

03/22-24/10

HLC team campus visit.


READING & COMMENTING ON THE 10/16/2009 DRAFT

On weird things in the text:

Regarding your comments:

Regarding previous Criterion Committee comments:

Regarding the Core Components


HLC Writing Team

Elizabeth Dunn, HLC Co-chair (Interim Dean, College of Arts & Sciences)

Marty Wolf, HLC Faculty Co-chair (Math & Computer Science Department)

Susan Hauser, Writer (English Department)

Chapter Five, Criterion Five Engagement and Service



Organization of Criterion Five

Criterion Five is organized according to the University Plan 2008-2013 Strategy B

Strategic Imperative B: Support and promote community vitality through Bemidji State’s commitments within our local, regional, national and world spheres. Bemidji State values the supportive relationships between the university and its communities.


Introduction

  1. University-wide Commitment to External Communities of Interest (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  2. University Plan Strategy B.1. Support and promote educational vitality (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  3. University Plan Strategy B.2 Support and promote economic vitality and quality of place (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  4. University Plan Strategy B.3 Support and promote cultural and recreational vitality (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  5. University Plan Strategy B.4 Promote environmental vitality (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d)

  6. Priorities for Improvement

Summary of Evidence


Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.


  • Core Component 5a The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations.

  • Core Component 5b The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities.

  • Core Component 5c The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service.

  • Core Component 5d Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides.


Introduction

Bemidji State University has meaningful, productive and enduring service relationships with its external constituents, as evidenced by the breadth, depth and success of its collaborations with communities of interest.


Bemidji State External Constituents

  • Potential students

  • Alumni

  • Businesses

  • Organizations

  • University Foundation

  • Other MnSCU schools

  • P-12 area schools

  • Governmental units

  • Minnesota State Legislature

  • Accrediting bodies

  • Granting agencies

  • Local, regional and state governments and communities

  • American Indian governments, communities and schools



Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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1. University-wide Commitment to External Constituencies Advance educational opportunities in the university’s communities through customized training, concurrent enrollment, PSEO, online and on-campus programs and related offerings.


Introduction

Bemidji State University is located in rural northern Minnesota where the winters are long and hard. Survival in this robust place has always depended on community, the community of American Indian tribes, of settlers, of neighbors. Early in the twentieth century, when the community needed trained teachers, citizens organized a campaign for their own college and Bemidji Normal School opened in 1919.


The community tradition of the Bemidji area continues today. In 2005, after the fateful high school shootings on the Red Lake Indian Reservation, Bemidji State and the town of Bemidji embraced its neighbors: healing ceremonies were held at the American Indian Resource Center and at North Country Regional Hospital. In 2009 when Minnesota State University Moorhead was forced to close by the flood waters of the Red River, Bemidji State opened its dormitories to their students.


Also in 2009, construction began in Bemidji on a regional Event Center, the culmination of years of work and collaboration that paired the community’s desire to improve its services to the region with the university’s need for a new sports facility.


The Higher Learning Commission Criterion Five asks for evidence that the university takes seriously its role in communities of interest. Better than that, Bemidji State has a symbiotic relationship with its communities, its neighbors. It is a north country tradition that assures not only survival but quality of life, including access to services, resources and opportunities, and preservation and enjoyment of cultural heritages.


Cedar Apartments for Single Parents

Housing for twenty-eight single parent families contributes to student success.



Linden Hall Suites

The first of Bemidji State’s residence halls to be transformed into suites, Linden is a popular choice for academic-year students and for summer conference housing.


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Mission Documents: In its mission documents, Bemidji State makes it clear that it operates within a broad community of external constituents and that it values those relationships. Starting with its mission, vision and signature themes, Bemidji State acknowledges the larger world in which the university operates, and the importance of civic action in a diverse world:


Vision: Shaping potential, shaping worlds. Bemidji State University is a catalyst for shaping the potential of those it serves who, in turn, shape the worlds in which they live and work.


Mission: E3 Engage. Embrace. Educate.

As northern Minnesota’s university, we engage in new worlds of thought, embrace responsible citizenship, and educate for a future that can only be imagined.


Signature Themes

International/multicultural understanding

Civic engagement

Environmental stewardship


The second (of four) strategies in the University Plan is dedicated to the university’s relationships with external constituents:


University Plan 2008-2013

Strategy B: Promote Vital Communities through Involvement

Strategic Imperative: Support and promote community vitality through Bemidji State’s commitments within our local, regional, national and world spheres.

Bemidji State values the supportive relationships between the university and its communities.


The strategies are informed, in part, by the environmental scan of the SCOT: Strengths, Challenges, Opportunities and Weaknesses~. This document analyzes internal and external forces that are likely to come to bear on university planning and helps the university understand the needs of its external constituents. As noted below, it is informed by university relationships and partnerships with its communities of interest.


Goals and measurements (accountability) for Strategy B are also included in the plan:

  • Goal Three Increase the number and type of partnerships with external entities.

  • Goal Four Increase the capacity of the custom college.

  • Goal Five Develop measurements of community service by students, faculty and staff.

  • Goal Six Improve graduation-related employment rates.


Academic outreach programs, such as online master’s degrees, are assessed through academic department five-year reviews, as described in Chapter Two.


EXB Solutions Opens Bemidji Office

EXB Solutions, a high-end test engineering firm, has selected Bemidji to be their primary office location.  They opened  their Bemidji office last June with a staff of six test engineers. Other EXB offices are located in Wayzata (MN), Phoenix (AZ) and Huntsville (AL).  EXB hired five seniors from the Physics Engineering Program at Bemidji State University as some of their initial employees. They have been awarded their Federal HUB Zone certification which will give them extra points in securing government contracts.



Social Work Program Field Expeditions

Faculty and students collaborate in Social Work practice.


MARS Community Connection: Faculty-run, Student-directed~link to MARS story by Crit 5 Cmte

Marketing Assistance & Research Solutions services include feasibility studies, Internet and exploratory research, focus groups, group interviews, telephone surveys, mail surveys and strategic management analysis.


MARS Mission

  • Provide talented students valuable and real marketing experiences.

  • Provide area organizations with competitively priced marketing information.


Accounting Students Help with Taxes through VITA


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included






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Civic Engagement—The University: Bemidji State models civic engagement through its community relationships. Senior staff represent the university at organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce, the Northwest Minnesota Foundation, and the Joint Economic Development Commission (JEDC), medical providers (e.g. North Country Regional Hospital, MeritCare Clinic) businesses (e.g. Nortech Systems, Anderson Fabrics, Black Star Dairy) and other agencies are also represented at these organizations. Community projects and needs are brought to meetings and ideas are exchanged. One example of a successful collaboration: a high-end test engineering firm opened a satellite office in Bemidji in part because of the potential employee pool among Bemidji State graduates (see sidebar)~.


In a less formal capacity, the university’s president meets personally with key office holders in the Bemidji area, such as the mayor of Bemidji, the president of North Country Regional Hospital, American Indian tribal chairs, and the superintendent of the Bemidji Public Schools. He also visits area schools, businesses and industries on a regular basis.


In addition to the above personal connections, Bemidji State continually conducts surveys to determine community needs and to ascertain its position in the community.


By way of example:

  • In 2003, the marketing firm Russell-Herder conducted community focus groups~ regarding Bemidji State. A 2004 report~ on the results of the focus groups proposes specific tactics to address concerns regarding the university’s service and image. ((examples of closing the loop per specific tactics: Marty is working on this.))

  • In 2001 Russell-Herder assisted the university in a review of its logo and mascot~. The report on the review contributed to the development of a new Bemidji State logo.

  • Fan survey, if action was taken??

  • Other??


Civic Engagement—Students, Faculty and Staff: In addition to its institutional role, the university contributes to its communities of interest through the actions of its students, faculty and staff. Contributions of students are discussed primarily in Chapter Four~ ((under SD &E)). They include student organizations such as Students Today Leaders Forever, Habitat for Humanity and Relay for Life, and projects in academic programs such as VITA~ (see sidebar) in the Accounting program.


Faculty and staff contributions include outreach and partnerships. As noted in Chapter One, these are described at length in Telling Our Stories: Outreach and Partnership Efforts at Bemidji State University, Committee for Outreach and Partnership, Spring 2001.~ ((The Telling Our Stories document, three parts, in Crit Five Cmte documents.)) Civic engagement on campus and in courses has also been studied. The results are documented in Inventory of Civic Engagement, Spring 2005~, and in a Campus Compact report, December 2008.~


The 2005 Inventory of Civic Engagement report recommends that Bemidji State undertake a systematic inventory of support for civic engagement activities at the university. The 2008 Campus Compact report recommends that the university pursue the opening of a service learning and civic engagement center. Based on the results of the those reports, Bemidji State has identified civic engagement as one of its three major Priorities for Improvement.~ See Priority for Improvement: Civic Engagement.

Collaborations Undertaken Include


Collaborations Declined Include

  • Range university

  • Other


Capacity for Engagement: Bemidji State University is judicious in its development of programs and activities for its external constituents. Criteria for consideration include the university’s ability to carry out a project, especially regarding faculty resources and capacity of facilities. The university also strives to assure that there is real need for such projects. As appropriate, the president’s cabinet, the Leadership Council and the Deans’ Council evaluate initiatives in light of other university planning and relevant indicators.


  • Core Component 5a The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations.

  • Core Component 5b The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities.

  • Core Component 5c The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service.

  • Core Component 5d Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides.



Concurrent Enrollment Timing

Bemidji State’s 20th-day enrollment count is up in part because concurrent enrollment numbers were available earlier than they were in Fall 2007. This year, 156 concurrent enrollment students were included in the 20th day headcount; in 2007, concurrent enrollment numbers were not available until October.


Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


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2. University Plan Strategy B.1 Support and promote educational vitality.

Advance educational opportunities in the university’s communities through customized training, concurrent enrollment, PSEO, online and on-campus programs and related offerings.


Bemidji State provides educational opportunities to its communities of interest, from elementary school through higher education and customized training.


Elementary, middle and high schools: In addition to maintaining personal contact between area school administrators and the university’s senior staff, Bemidji State has multiple connections with the area’s high schools, including the following:

Level C Post-Secondary Education Options (PSEO): (High school students must meet eligibility requirements.)

Level D On-campus: Students in area high schools attend classes on the Bemidji State campus. Fifty-five PSEO students enrolled in on-campus classes Fall 2009.

Level D Concurrent enrollment: Students take Bemidji State classes in their high school classrooms. Their teachers must meet certain requirements and are mentored by a Bemidji State professor.




Concurrent Enrollment: 2005 - 2009

YrTr

Courses

Head Count

Credits

2006-F

1

15

30

2006-S

1

13

39

2007-F

1

23

115

2007-S

2

57

285

2008-F

7

122

426

2008-S

8

120

459

2009-F

9

154

574

2009-S

7

127

475

Total

631

2403

High Schools: Voyageurs; Bemidji; Park Rapids Area

Courses offered: ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, ENGL 2355, PHYS 2101, MATH 1170, MATH 1107, BUAD 1100 ((include course titles))


Level C Teacher Training: Bemidji State places ((xx)) student teachers each year in area public schools. This program provides education students with classroom experience and provides support and professional development opportunities for area teachers. ((do we have a brochure or web site or something that we use to solicit classrooms for student teachers??))


Level C College Preparatory Programs: Through special programs, Bemidji State assists area students in preparation for college.


By way of example:

Math prep program: need info and link for this (I have a hard copy but do not have electronic))

360 Degrees: This innovative program guides high school students with an interest in technology careers to programs that will help them fulfill their career goals. ~Data Site document “360 Annual Report FY'07

((MORE HERE—Psy summer, Music Camp, others))


Level C Summer Programs at Bemidji State introduce area high school students to campus opportunities and promote college-readiness.

Level D Upward Bound: This federally-funded program encourages area high school students to consider higher education and helps prepare them for success in college.


Higher education: Bemidji State serves its external constituents through course and program offerings to individuals and through collaborations with other post-secondary institutions.


Level C Distance Learning Programs~: Described in Chapter Three, these programs offer higher education opportunities to students who cannot or choose not to study on-campus at Bemidji State.


Level CCampus Support for Distance Learning: The university supports its distance learning programs through the library and student services.


Level D In response to a need identified through assessment, the A.C. Clark Library provides access to library holdings and services for distance learners. ((Do we have documentation on the assessment??))


Level DThrough its web site, the Center for Extended Learning guides distance learners to university services, including Admissions and Financial Aid.


Level CPost-Secondary Collaborations: Bemidji State has formal relationships with numerous post-secondary institutions.


Level DMnSCU has an elaborate system of course articulations, promoting seamless transfer for general education courses within the system and assisting with course transfers for majors. ((is there a page we can to with this? a # we can use, of schools, or courses??))


Bemidji State has program articulations with xx MnSCU institutions ((do we have any outside the system?)), including the following: ((examples here)) These help promote timely graduation for transfer students.


The university also collaborates with other institutions to offer degrees, including the following:


Level DBemidji State has articulations / agreements/?? with area tribal colleges, including Red Lake and Leech Lake.


Level DOther outreach programs meet specific needs or interests, such as the following:


  • GEM Scholars Program~: This research partnership offers opportunities in Geology, Environmental Science and Meteorology (GEM) to American Indian Students. The partners are Purdue University, Bemidji State University, Red Lake Nations College and Leech Lake Tribal College.

  • UArctic: Bemidji State is pursuing a relationship with the University of the Arctic, “a cooperative network of universities, colleges, and other organizations committed to higher education and research in the North.”

  • Casper, Wyoming: More info on this -


Customized Training: Through its Center for Research and Innovation the university offers services to area businesses and industries that include networking, custom training, strategic planning development and media development. CRI currently serves ((xxx??)) businesses and industries in northern Minnesota, including ((xxx)).


CRI is also host to the Minnesota Small Business Development Center, Northwest Region. The SBDC provides management and technical assistance to small businesses.


  • Core Component 5a The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations.

  • Core Component 5b The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities.

  • Core Component 5c The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service.

  • Core Component 5d Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides.





Bemidji State Recognizes Community Leaders


Bemidji State University Hall of Fame Recognizes Community Leaders


In Collaboration with the Northwest Minnesota Foundation, Bemidji State Women’s Hall of Fame Recognizes Regional Leaders


Endowed Chairs at Bemidji State

Established in recognition and appreciation of Bemidji State’s mission to Engage, Embrace, Educate:


Endowed Chair Opportunity


3. University Plan Strategy B.2 Support and promote economic vitality and quality of place.

Build capacity for problem-solving and community building through partnerships and engagement with businesses, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and other entities.


Bemidji State and its community partners work together to assure mutual economic success for their shared constituencies.


Bemidji Community: The university’s relationships with the City of Bemidji, Beltrami County, American Indian communities and the northern tier of Minnesota are manifold. They range from recreational planning to disaster planning and include a variety of shared efforts and opportunities.


Level CRegional Event Center: Bemidji State University recently signed a twenty-year lease as the anchor tenant in the new Regional Event Center being built by the City of Bemidji. The agreement process involved the MnSCU system, the State Attorney General’s office and the State Department of Finance.


Level CDiamond Point Park: Bemidji State and the City of Bemidji partnered on the recent renovation of this important city park. The collaboration includes the housing of the university’s Outdoor Program Center at the park.


Level CUniversity Facilities: The Bemidji State campus is available for rental for community events, such as an annual boat show, and for weddings and other private events. A process is in place for evaluating and scheduling rental requests.


Level CCivic Engagement: In recent years, Bemidji State has done several surveys to determine the extent of civic engagement by Bemidji State students, faculty and staff. The surveys indicate that the Bemidji State community participates in civic engagement. See Priorities for Improvement: Civic Engagement~ on plans to improve such activity.

  • Telling Our Stories~ ((three documents from Crit Five documents)), Spring 2001, compiled by the Outreach & Partnership Committee, describes in detail the activities of forty-three faculty and staff members.

  • Civic Engagement Survey~, 2005, reports on civic engagement in classes~.

  • Campus Compact~, 2008, expands on the 2005 report and includes examples from students on civic engagement activities.

  • ((Is there a NSSE item to reference here?))


Level CCollaboration with Government Agencies: The university maintains regular relationships with local governments, including law enforcement, to assure cooperation on matters of law, health and related issues, including disaster planning and law enforcement. ((documentation??))


Level CCommunity Appreciation Day: Bemidji State hosts an annual day of appreciation in recognition of its external constituents. The 2009 event hosted more than 2,500 guests who visited twenty information booths sponsored by academic departments student clubs and observed nine athletic teams at practice.


Level CUniversity Foundation: The Bemidji State Foundation promotes and maintains relationships with alumni and with area businesses, industries and individuals. ((additional info—evidence))

  • Core Component 5a The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations.

  • Core Component 5b The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities.

  • Core Component 5c The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service.

  • Core Component 5d Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides.


Bemidji State Participates in Shared Vision

Shared Vision seeks to be a catalyst that encourages the Bemidji community to work together to expand social, economic, education and leadership opportunities for people of all races.” Indian Country Today

Don Day, Director, Bemidji State University American Indian Resource Center, is a member of Shared Vision.


Research Documents Race Relations Concern

A survey commissioned by Shared Vision* indicates a division between white and American communities.


The Community Responds: Bemidji Businesses Including Ojibwe in Signs

Boozhoo” welcomes patrons in Bemidji.


* “Shared Vision seeks to be a catalyst that encourages the Bemidji community to work together to expand social, economic, education and leadership opportunities for people of all races.” Indian Country Today

Don Day, Director, Bemidji State University American Indian Resource Center, is a member of Shared Vision.


Bemidji State Hosts American Indian Education Summit

Keynote speaker Dr. Will Antell is Bemidji State alum.


Bemidji State Supports the Literary Arts

D & F http://www.bemidjistate.edu/bsutoday/news-updates/2008/07/09/early-submission-deadline-set-for-2009-edition-of-dust-and-fire

or

http://www.bemidjistate.edu/academics/publications/dust_and_fire/

NV http://www.bemidjistate.edu/academics/publications/new_voices/


Other Arts here...


4. University Plan Strategy B.3 Support and promote cultural and recreational vitality.

Participate in the enrichment of our communities through development and support of the arts and other cultural and recreational offerings.


Cultures and Heritage: Bemidji State promotes cultural vitality through its relationships with communities of interest.

  • American Indian Tribal Colleges: Bemidji State supports the Leech Lake Tribal College and the Red Lake Nations Tribal College through articulation agreements, consultations, and similar relationships.

  • American Indian Reservations: The university president and other members of the Bemidji State community maintain formal and informal relationships with the Red Lake and Leech Lake Indian Reservations, in part through the university’s American Indian Resource Center.

  • Bemidji community organizations: Bemidji State participates in community organizations for change, including Bemidji Leads, Shared Vision, and the Bemidji Race Relations Council.

  • American Indian Resource Center, Bemidji State: Opened in 2003, offices housed in AIRD include the Indian Studies and Ojibwe Language programs, Retention Counseling, and the Council of Indian Students. The AIRC director serves as a liaison between Bemidji State and regional American Indian communities and represents American Indian students to the university. The building is designed to support and represent American Indian architectural values.

  • Annual Spring Powwow, sponsored by the Bemidji State Indian Student Council is held at the university.

  • University of the Arctic: As noted above, Bemidji State is pursuing a relationship with the University of the Arctic.


The Arts: The university provides arts and entertainment offerings open to the public and promotes collaboration between area and university artists.

  • The Theatre Program collaborates with the community on performance opportunities and connects the community to national trends in theatre. ~Report from cmte five, misc stories BSU Theatre Dept

  • The Music Department collaborates with the community on performance opportunities and connects the community to national trends in theatre. ~Report from cmte five, misc stories BSU Music Dept

  • The Visual Arts Department galleries are open to the public.


Athletics and Recreation: The university provides athletic and recreation opportunities that are open to the public and promotes collaboration between area and university athletics and recreation.

  • Bemidji State athletic events are open to the public, including men’s and women’s basketball, golf and ice hockey and men’s baseball, football, soccer, softball, tennis, track/cross-country and volleyball.

  • Summer camps for high school students are sponsored in girls’ and boys’ basketball and in boys’ soccer and volleyball.

  • The Bemidji State Campus Recreation Center is available for private rental for birthday parties, school groups, and campus/community organizations.

  • The Outdoor Program Center and OPC sponsored trips are open to the public.


((Frozen Four, Event Center, etc.))


  • Core Component 5a The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations.

  • Core Component 5b The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities.

  • Core Component 5c The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service.

  • Core Component 5d Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides.


5. University Plan Strategy B.4 Promote environmental vitality.

Work with partners to assure the environmental stewardship of our shared communities.


As promised in its Signature Themes and its Strategies for 2008-2013, Bemidji State is committed to environmental stewardship on its campus and beyond.


By way of example:


  • Shoreline and water quality protection:

Shoreline research & grants (Welle)

Water quality research & grants (Kroeger)

  • Recreational use:

Diamond Point Park

Bike trail

Hobson Forest

  • Sustainability:

Sustainability coordinator

Hobson Union wind power

Evidence/Information Yet to Be Included


Ideas?
Comments?
Corrections? Information?
Please contact Marty Wolf, # 23, mwolf, 2825



6. Priorities for Improvement





Graphic Banner Here (narrow, to distinguish between single column above and double column below) – repeat at end/beginning of double columns.


Criterion Five: Engagement and Service

Summary of Evidence


Core Component 5a The organization learns from the constituencies it serves and analyzes its capacity to serve their needs and expectations.


Core Component 5b The organization has the capacity and the commitment to engage with its identified constituencies and communities.


Core Component 5c The organization demonstrates its responsiveness to those constituencies that depend on it for service.


Core Component 5d Internal and external constituencies value the services the organization provides.