Resumes

Writing Your Resume

Resume Do’s & Dont’s                 Common Resume Questions

           

Purpose Of A Resume

  • Gain an interview
  • Your personal marketing tool
  • Outlining skills and abilities
  • Sneak preview of what you have to offer

Preparing Your Resume

  • Use Microsoft Word
  • Templates are not user friendly when needing to make changes
  • Set tabs for dates, etc. instead of using the space bar—you will have less problems when uploading your resume in BSUCareers

Elements Of A Resume

PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION

  • Name
  • Address—without abbreviations.  Typically has both present and permanent address
  • Phone number with area code
  • E-mail address—make sure this is professional

OBJECTIVE

  • States the type of employment you are seeking—can be job specific
  • Should be worded as clearly as possible—avoid vague over-generalizations
  • Do not use personal pronouns on your resume
  • The objective may be put in the cover letter instead of on the resume

EDUCATION

  • List names, location, attendance dates and degrees from colleges and universities
  • Do not need to list if no degree obtained
  • Reverse chronological order
  • High school optional
  • Include honors and study abroad programs
  • With multiple honors, have a separate section
  • Can list GPA if over 3.0–(3.5 for certain majors)
  • Emphasize education if you have little experience

EXPERIENCE

  • Work Experience
    • Include Job Title
    • Name and location of employer (city/state)
    • Dates of employment—starting with the most recent employment and going in reverse chronological order
    • Describe responsibilities using action oriented words (see table below)
    • List skills developed and accomplishments
    • Important to list, even if it is not relevant to your present job goals
    • It is significant to an employer if you worked while going to school
    • Skills from employment transfer to new jobs (organizational skills, supervisory skills, communication skills, etc.)
  • Internship Experience
    • May have a separate category, or list under “Relevant Experience”
    • Include skills developed and accomplishments
    • Describe responsibilities using action oriented words
  • Related Experience
    • Volunteer Work in your field
    • Class projects that are related to your degree
    • Experience from practica related to your degree

Potential Action Words To Describe Tasks/Responsibilities/Job Duties

 

Accommodate Calculate Develop Hire Mediate Publish
Accomplish Catalogue Direct Identify Merchandise Recommend
Achieve Chair Distribute Illustrate Moderate Reconcile
Adapt Clarify Draft Implement Modify Recruit
Administer Collaborate Edit Improve Monitor Rectify
Advertise Communicate Educate Increase Motivate Redesign
Advise Compare Encourage Index Negotiate Renew
Advocate Conceive Establish Influence Obtain Report
Affect Conceptualize Estimate Inform Operate Represent
Analyze Conciliate Evaluate Initiate Order Research
Anticipate Conduct Examine Innovate Organize Resolve
Apply Consult Exchange Inspect Originate Review
Appraise Contract Execute Install Participate Revise
Approach Control Expand Institute Perceive Schedule
Approve Cooperate Expedite Instruct Perform Screen
Arrange Coordinate Facilitate Integrate Persuade Solve
Assemble Create Familiarize Interpret Plan Speak
Assess Decide Forecast Interview Present Standardize
Assign Define Formulate Investigate Preside Stimulate
Assist Delegate Fund-Raise Invent Problem-Solve Summarize
Assume Demonstrate Generate Lead Process Supervise
Attain Design Govern Listen Produce
Author Designate Guide Maintain Promote
Budget Detail Handle Manage Propose
Build Determine Hire Market Provide

SKILLS

  • Can have a separate section for skills such as:
    • Computer skills
    • Foreign language skills
    • Use of equipment/tools in your field of study

ACTIVITIES AND HONORS

  • List all involvement in clubs, on or off campus committees, dorm council, etc.
  • Employers do look closely at this—make assumptions regarding leadership, organizational skills, interpersonal communications, multi-tasking, etc.
  • For Honors—list scholarships, awards, Dean’s list, Student Achievement Conference, etc.

REFERENCES

  • Be sure to have 3 to 5 references
  • Appropriate references for students are:
    • Faculty
    • Past or present employers
    • Coaches
    • Internship Supervisors
    • Volunteer Supervisors
  • Have a separate reference page
  • Include name, title, company, full address and phone number for each reference
  • Be sure to ask these people in advance
  • Usually do not need to say “References available upon request.

Potential Resume Headings

ACADEMIC HONORS CERTIFICATIONS LEADERSHIP PROFILE RESEARCH
ACHIEVEMENTS CIVIC ACTIVITIES LICENSES QUALIFICATIONS RESEARCH PROJECTS
ACTIVITIES & HONORS COMPUTER SKILLS PRESENTATIONS RECOGNITION SCHOLARSHIPS
AWARDS CONFERENCES ATTENDED PROFESSIONAL PROFILE RELATED COURSEWORK THESIS
CAMPUS INVOLVEMENT EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL SUMMARY RELATED EXPERIENCE WORK EXPERIENCE

Styles Of Resumes

  • Vary according to your profession.
    • Graphic Design resumes very different from Business Administration resumes
  • Most resumes should be 1 page
  • 2 page resumes acceptable in Education and Human Services fields
  • 2 page resumes need to be 2 full pages

Scannable Resume

  • Need key word summary to define your skills, experience, education, competencies, professional affiliations…
  • Use jargon and acronyms specific to your field
  • Incorporate words from a job description—most likely are key words
  • Use white or light-colored paper
  • Use fonts between 10 and 14 points
  • Avoid italics, script or underlines
  • Use standard typefaces (Helvetica, Times, etc.)
  • Omit parentheses, brackets, shading