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2014-2015 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog

PDF of Geography Courses

Geography Courses

All Geography Courses

GEOG 1224 Introduction to Map Use (3 credits)

This course is designed for the liberal education program and provides an introduction to common characteristics and use of map media. Topographic maps will be used for physical analysis as well as to discern cultural and economic features of landscapes. Thematic maps, their use and applications will be presented. Includes some study out-of-doors with map and compass. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 11.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 1400 World Regional Geography (3 credits)

A survey of physical, cultural, and economic aspects of world regions. An introduction to how constituent parts of the world differ from one another in their associated resources, cultures and economics. Attention is given to the interrelationships, interdependencies, and associations that bind together the diverse communities of the world. Liberal Education Goal Areas 7 & 8.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 2100 Introduction to Physical Geography (3 credits)

This course is designed for the liberal education program and provides an introduction to spatial patterns derived from earth system processes. The course provides a systematic survey of land forms, weather and climate, soils and vegetation. This course utilizes a combination of in class discussion and laboratory-like exercises to investigate these topics. Liberal Education Goal Area 3.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 2200 Introduction to Human Geography (3 credits)

Emphasizes the study of geographical relationships and interactions of cultural, social, economic, ethnic, and political phenomena. Topical approach to population subgroups, religions, languages, urban and rural settlements, and other attributes of the cultural landscape. Liberal Education Goal Areas 7 & 8.
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GEOG 2300 Economic Geography (3 credits)

Spatial structure of world economic activities; agriculture, forestry, fishing, mining, industry and trade. Liberal Education Goal Area 5.
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GEOG 2400 Introduction to Planning (3 credits)

This course is designed for the liberal education program and provides information on the background and fundamentals of the community planning process. Includes discussion of contemporary issues in physical, environmental and social planning. Emphasis is on the local and subregional levels. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 9.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 2925 People and the Environment: Geography Perspective (3 credits)

An integrative study of the natural, social, value-based, and citizen-action contexts for environmental awareness. The disciplinary component surveys geographic approaches to and institutional settings for environmental problems and decision making, including our spatial behaviors as either sources or recipients of environmental impacts. Interdisciplinary perspectives are evaluated in light of different geographic concepts of spatial distributions, physical geography, and regional planning. Liberal Education Goal Area 10
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GEOG 3125 Weather and Climate (3 credits)

Weather is the study of the atmosphere over short time scales, while climate is the study of long-term weather trends. The study of weather is commonly termed meteorology, which is actually a branch of physics associated with fluid dynamics. Climate is associated with statistical procedures and analyses. This course examines the geographic patterns and processes of global climate and weather, as well as topics such as global climate change, global climate models, and extreme weather events. Students learn about the Earths atmosphere; energy budgets and astronomical controls on weather processes; oceanic and atmospheric circulation; the basic atmospheric parameters; atmospheric hazards such as tornadoes, hurricanes, hail, and lightning; and global climate change issues. Prerequisite: GEOG 2100 or consent of instructor.
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GEOG 3226 Cartography (3 credits)

This course provides a more integrated, practical link between cartographic theory and practice for users of GIS. This course blends theoretical discussion of GIS as a science and GIS as a software application and addresses through lecture and laboratory work map productions for a variety of audiences. A particular focus of this course is on quality communication through maps. Experience with GIS software is essential. Prerequisite: GEOG 3231.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 3231 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3 credits)

This course develops a proficiency in basic GIS skills for those new to GIS. Techniques for problem solving and cartographic mapping concepts are also introduced, as they are essential to quality cartographic representation and a marketable skill set. This course concentrates on learning to navigate the current version of ArcGIS software at a beginner's level and one developing and creating maps as communication tools.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 3232 Intermediate Geographic Information Systems (3 credits)

An intermediate course on the theories and application of GIS for spatial data management and analysis, thematic mapping, environmental modeling. This course expands on the concepts and methods presented in Introduction to GIS and guides students through a more comprehensive overview of principles and techniques used in GIS. Course objectives include (1) enhance and build knowledge of GIS as a system and science, (2) improve skills at GIS analysis, and (3) develop and improve problem solving skills. Prerequisite: GEOG 3231 or consent of instructor.
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GEOG 3255 Introduction to Remote Sensing (3 credits)

Analysis of a special class of pictures that provide an overhead perspective. These images have unique properties that provide a distinct advantage to assessing spatial changes and patterns of change on the Earths surface. Students develop an understanding and the skills necessary for interpreting air photos, satellite, and remotely sensed images. Prerequisite: GEOG 3231 or consent of instructor.
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GEOG 3410 Geography of North America (3 credits)

A regional analysis of the physical, demographic, economic and cultural characteristics of the nations in North America.
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GEOG 3460 Teaching of Middle and Secondary School Social Studies (4 credits)

Objectives, activities, methods, and materials in teaching social studies in grades 5-12. Additional laboratory time is required. Prerequisite: ED 3110.
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GEOG 3531 Political Geography (3 credits)

This course utilizes "World Systems Theory" to investigate 1) theories of State formation and organization; 2) historical processes of imperialism, colonialism, and decolonization; 3) major issues of the emerging political economy; 4) historical and contemporary geopolitics; and 5) the political geography of everyday life.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 3532 Political Ecology (3 credits)

Political ecology utilizes a necessary geographical perspective to understand and analyze the biophysical processes that shape issues otherwise inadequately conceptualized as political, economic or social. This spatial understanding developed by political geographers reveals relationships of the ecological and the political that are simultaneously mutually reinforcing and, often, mutually antagonistic. Prerequisite: GEOG 3531 or consent of instructor.
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GEOG 3550 Site and Resource Analysis in Planning (3 credits)

This course emphasizes techniques and methods in the location, analysis, evaluation, and design of sites, focusing on identifying use potentials and impact limitations for planning and management. Prerequisite: GEOG 2400 or consent of instructor.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 3560 Metropolitan Land Use Planning (3 credits)

An examination of the identification and inventory methods of land use analysis including the designing of land use models which are compatible with environmental, social, and economic goals. Prerequisites: GEOG 2100, GEOG 2400, or consent of instructor. Prior completion of or concurrent enrollment in either GEOG 3550 or GEOG 3570 is recommended.
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GEOG 3570 Public Lands Planning (3 credits)

Comparison and evaluation of natural resource management policies and analytical techniques of the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Attention is paid to the historical and contemporary land management approaches used to protect, exploit, manage, and/or use public lands in the United States. Especially relevant are jurisdictional issues over public land, federal agencies involved in land management, state and local issues and land management, and contemporary issues associated with land management in the 21st Century. Prerequisites: GEOG 2400 and GEOG 3550, or consent of instructor.
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GEOG 3580 Regional Development Planning (3 credits)

An examination of methods and processes emphasizing contemporary relationships between planners and governments, the private sector, and nongovernmental organizations regarding relationships between regions nationally and internationally, with special attention to environmental sustainability. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 2400 and GEOG 3570, and either GEOG 2300 or GEOG 3560. Students are strongly recommended to have previously completed GEOG 4265 or to be enrolled in GEOG 4265 concurrently with GEOG 3580.
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GEOG 3630 Conservation Biology (3 credits)

Methods and theory of conservation biology; species diversity, extinction rates, management of endangered species, and the economics of conservation strategies. Also BIOL 3630.
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GEOG 3800 Regional Geography (1-3 credits)

A regional and topical analysis of the cultural and physical features of a continent or major region of the earth. May be repeated provided different regions are involved. Note: Recommended for students in international studies, foreign languages, and for prospective teachers in the humanities or social studies.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 3810 Geography of Europe (3 credits)

A regional analysis of the cultural, economic, physical and landscape patterns of the European cultural region. NOTE: Recommended for students in Euro-Spring, International Studies, foreign languages, and prospective teachers. Liberal Education Goal Area 5.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 3820 Geography of East, South, and Southeast Asia (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide a more in depth look at Asian sub regions of South, East and Southeast Asia. Geographically, we will examine and analyze activities in this part of the world through cultural, demographic, political, economic, urban and geopolitical lenses. Liberal Education Goal Area 8. Might not be offered every year. Prerequisite: GEOG 1400 or GEOG 2200.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 3840 Geography of Africa (3 credits)

Despite persistent bias about it, Africa's cultural complexity, social dynamism, and political/economic struggle have tremendous relevance for the study of global trends at the start of the twenty-first century. The central purpose of this course is to demonstrate that relevance by investigating the cultural, historical, economic, and political dimensions of change in Africa.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 3850 Geography of the Middle East (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide a more in depth look at the region we routinely describe as the Middle East. Geographically, we will examine activities in SW Asia and the nations of North Africa. We may extend our discussion to the countries of Afghanistan, the Sudan, South Sudan and Turkey to provide a more comprehensive analysis of a particular topic or subtopic. This is a highly complex region and may be looked at from numerous perspectives. Our objective thus is to examine the region through economic, cultural, environmental, urban and geopolitical lenses. Prerequisite: GEOG 1400 or GEOG 2200.
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GEOG 3860 Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide a more in depth look at the region of Latin America and the Caribbean. We recognize at the outset that this is a broad subject and may be looked at from numerous perspectives. Our objective thus is to examine this geographic region through economic, cultural, environmental, urban and political lenses. The text book provides the basis for our study which is further complemented by each students (1) research into an issue or event that had a far reaching impact on this region or within its sub-regions, (2) reading of works of fiction set in Latin America and (3) viewing feature films with Latin American themes. Prerequisite: GEOG 1400 or GEOG 2200.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 4120 Urban Geography (3 credits)

Functions and distribution of cities. Urban sizes, hierarchies, and external relations with the countryside. The central place and other theories of the spacing of cities. Internal structures and functions of cities, the growth of cities, urban slums, urban sprawl, and city planning. Systematic. Prerequisite: GEOG 2200 or consent of instructor.
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GEOG 4130 Biogeography (3 credits)

This course examines the distribution and diversity of flora and fauna across multiple scales. It will focus on the factors that shape and influence these patterns and investigate the role of disturbance in this process. It will also incorporate both field and lab experiences to further examine the key concepts of biogeography. Prerequisites: GEOG 2100 and GEOG 3231.
Common Course Outline

GEOG 4140 Landscape Ecology (3 credits)

This course examines the connection of pattern and process at the scale of the landscape. Students will utilize several analytical methods to examine and explain how humans, disturbance and natural process work in concert to create landscape-level dynamics and change. The course will also cover how landscape ecology is applied to assist in conservation efforts. Prerequisites: GEOG 2100 and GEOG 3231
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GEOG 4190 Qualitative Methods in Geographic Research (3 credits)

As a geographic perspective becomes increasingly important in analysis of critical issues at multiple scales from the local to the global, this course demonstrates how research grounded in qualitative methodologies encourages innovative approaches and yields significant insights. Prerequisite: GEOG 2200. While not required, it is highly recommended that GEOG 4210 and GEOG 4265 be taken previously or concurrently.
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GEOG 4210 The History and Development of Geographic Thought (3 credits)

Development of the discipline of Geography with emphasis on both the historical and recent developments in the field. Includes a critical analysis of writing of representative geographers.
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GEOG 4265 Spatial Analysis (3 credits)

An examination in the concepts and application of advance spatial statistical methodologies. These include, kriging, spatial autocorrelation, spatial regression models, and cluster analysis. Prerequisites: STAT 2610 or PSY 3401 or BUAD 2231 and GEOG 3231.
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GEOG 4275 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3 credits)

This course will give students hands on experience working with advanced geodatabases, the basic automation and scripting of geospatial processes, web mapping, and server side application in GIS. Prerequisites: GEOG 3231 and GEOG 3232.
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GEOG 4910 Directed Independent Study (4 credits)

Arranged individual study.
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GEOG 4970 Internship (4 credits)

Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. Student internships may be either full-time or part-time in a public or private agency appropriate to the degree objective. Internships consist of closely supervised periods of service that are arranged in advance of the course registration. Students should consult their advisor concerning prerequisites.
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GEOG 4990 Thesis (3 credits)

Working individually with a thesis advisor, the student produces a Geography thesis. The thesis must be a scholarly piece of work, based on empirical or archival research of a geographical issue (physical, demographic, economic, cultural, and/or political) of present or future relevance. The end product is a documented essay of at least minimally required length and format that must be approved by the advisor and at least one other member of the Geography Department after a brief oral defense.
Common Course Outline