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Updated 2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog

PDF of Indigenous Studies Courses

Indigenous Studies Courses

All Indigenous Studies Courses

INST 1107 Introduction to Turtle Island (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the study of American Indians from a cultural and academic perspective. The academic overview will include considerations of breadth, method of research, terminology, and principles of various disciplines that include American Indians in their fields of study. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 7.
Common Course Outline

INST 1202 Indigenous Environmental Current Events (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with the abilities to read and view various media sources critically. An in-depth focus on how current events have the potential to shape our lives requires "reading between the lines". Students will have the opportunity to identify the audience of various current event articles and the purpose of the articles, journalist and producer. Liberal Education Goal Area 5.
Common Course Outline

INST 2201 Creation to Contact (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a literary experience and understanding of the philosophical and mythological mindset of individual and tribal people in the Americas. And in later times, empathize with the racism and challenges that American Indian cultures had in regard to the social, economic, political, and religious policies and practices of European and American societies in the United States. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 7.
Common Course Outline

INST 2202 Survivance Since Contact (3 credits)

This course is designed to follow American Indians Post-contact 1887 by providing to students a literary experience and understanding of the philosophical and mythological mindset of individual and tribal people in the Americas. And in current times, empathize with the racism and challenges that American Indian cultures face in regard to the social, economic, political, and religious policies and practices of European and American societies in the United States. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 7.
Common Course Outline

INST 2410 Ojibwe Crafts (2 credits)

An introduction to the Ojibwe crafts in relation to their culture. Demonstration, instruction and studio experience in basketmaking, hide tanning, the making of leather goods, beading, jewelry making and quilting.
Common Course Outline

INST 2925 People of the Environment: Indigenous Knowledge Perspective (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with the ability to integrate Indigenous Studies with Environmental Studies. An in-depth focus will cover how environmental practices affect Indigenous cultures. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own understanding of Indigenous and Environmental Studies and develop strategies that will enable them to view both disciplines interdependent of one another. Liberal Education Goal Area 10.
Common Course Outline

INST 3170 Indigenous Education (3 credits)

Inquiry and analysis of the complexities of multiple standards of education in the U. S. including race class, gender, ethnicity, disability, age, nationality and religion, how they shape and are shaped by social and cultural tribal and non-tribal life in the United States will be examined. The course emphasizes the development of indigenous knowledge, critical thinking, analytical skills, and interpersonal and inter group interactions necessary for living and working in a society characterized by tribal and western mainstream diversity. Through the mindful study of small, rural schools and traditional education practices students will find a greater understanding of (tribal) others, develop self-understanding of education in the U.S. and develop understanding in relation to others- in order to promote ethical behaviors and values in education that support a diverse world. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 7.
Common Course Outline

INST 3307 Ojibwe History (3 credits)

The oral and written history of the People from origins to the early 20th century, analyzing the Ojibwe response to changes brought by European and American society. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 7.
Common Course Outline

INST 3317 Tribal Government and Leadership (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding of traditional, transitional, and contemporary tribal governments based on the experiences of the Anishinaabe (Ojibwe) in Minnesota and other tribes. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 8.
Common Course Outline

INST 3410 Advanced Ojibwe Crafts (1-4 credits)

Advanced study of American Indian craft media techniques and concepts geared to meet the needs of individual students and to help them develop personal direction. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite: INST/VSAR 2410.
Common Course Outline

INST 3710 Indigenous Environmental Knowledge: Global Perspective (3 credits)

Indigenous cultures refer to pre-colonial societies who today represent a minority, non-dominant group in the societies presently residing in territories these cultures once developed. Throughout their history, Indigenous people have developed their own body of environmental knowledge that they have passed on, generation to generation. This course will provide students with a global perspective of Indigenous environmental knowledge and how this knowledge has affected the relationship of the Indigenous peoples with the natural world and its resources. Students will also investigate present-day political, economic, social, and technological issues related to incorporating Indigenous environmental knowledge into sustainability efforts.
Common Course Outline

INST 3720 Food Sovereignty, Health & Indigenous Environments (3 credits)

This course is designed to help students understand the interconnections of food sovereignty, health and environmental sustainability. Students will explore why it is not only important for people to control the way their food is produced, distributed, and consumed but why the food should be appropriate to the cultural background of the people consuming it. Students will learn the critical connections between food and health with an exploration of those influences within the context of Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing. This is an experiential learning course -- learning through interaction, projects, and reflection. This course may be suitable as an elective in Indigenous Studies and Environmental Studies, Health and Nursing degree programs.
Common Course Outline

INST 3730 Sustainable Communities: Local Indigenous Perspective (3 credits)

Human societies all across the globe have developed rich sets of experiences and explanations relating to the sustainable communities they live, work and play in. This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of these sustainable communities. Students will learn how these communities function, their challenges, and the critical networks that exist with the environment. This class will explore the role of Indigenous knowledge and traditional ways of learning, as well as scientific knowledge in maintaining the sustainability of a community. This is an experiential learning course -- learning through interaction, projects, and reflection.
Common Course Outline

INST 3740 Environment, Wellness & the Sacred Connection to Place (3 credits)

In Indigenous communities, there is a deep and lasting connection to place. Today, there exists overwhelming evidence that connection to place offers important elements for overall individual wellness. However, many communities face challenges in their environments that are detrimental to their health and well-being. To support these communities, there is a need to reconnect them with ways to restore the sustainability of their environment and connection to place. In this course, students will learn the critical connections between the environment and health and will explore the influences of connection to place within the context of Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing. This is an experiential learning course -- learning through interaction, projects, and reflection.
Common Course Outline

INST 3750 Sustainable Communities: Global Indigenous Perspective (3 credits)

Throughout their history, Indigenous people have developed their own body of knowledge on global sustainability that they have passed on, generation to generation. This course will provide students with a large picture perspective of global Indigenous sustainability knowledge and viewpoints and how this perspective continues to affect the relationship of the Indigenous peoples with the natural world and its resources. Students will also investigate present-day global political, economic, social, and technological issues related to incorporating Indigenous views into sustainability efforts across the continents.
Common Course Outline

INST 3888 Indigenous Women Writers (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a deeper understanding of traditional qualities found in contemporary woman writers who describe the experience of native women through the lens of several generations. This work comes to play an important role in contemporary thought as the values and cultures of indigenous people rapidly reflect change in their world and the world around them. Issues that are unique to native women in our contemporary time are paralleled to native women's experiences of the past. Liberal Education Goal Area 6.
Common Course Outline

INST 3890 Genealogy and Clan Systems (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with a hands-on experience with individual genealogical research and family tree development. In addition, the genealogical information may be used in conjunction with identifying specific tribal clans that are unique to each individual and their specific tribal history. An academic and cultural overview of how clan systems work is part of the course design. Liberal Education Goal Areas 5 & 7.
Common Course Outline

INST 4000 Nation Building and Leadership (3 credits)

This course provides students with an opportunity to analyze leadership and diverse strategies for Native nation building through the lens of development and sustainability. Prerequisites: INST 1107, and INST 2201 or INST 2202, and INST 3307 or INST 3317, or professor permission.
Common Course Outline

INST 4207 Indigenous Lifeways (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and awareness of the native philosophical world views and the interface that occurs among indigenous peoples and western people. Part of this understanding is that of two worlds; one of those worlds is the native world and the other being the western world. At the heart of native existence is the spiritual ecology, natural environments, human geography, identity, Indian activism, Christian and native religious beliefs and contemporary life ways. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or by consent of instructor.
Common Course Outline

INST 4418 Federal Indian Law (3 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding and awareness of the modern complexities of American Indian federal law and policies regarding diverse tribal nations in the U.S. by exploring readings by experts in the field of Federal Indian Law. The multiple shapes and shaping theories of what constitutes the identity of tribal nations and individual Indians and their recognition, limited recognition or lack of recognition in relationship to federal law and policy will be explored. (Might not be offered every year.)
Common Course Outline

INST 4900 Social Justice (3 credits)

This course examines steps that individuals and societies must take to create a more just society. Students will learn how to identify and address unequal power relations, marginalization, and racism and engage in skillful interactions that enable them to maintain their integrity within society. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or by consent of instructor.
Common Course Outline

INST 4990 Thesis (3 credits)

When taken as Senior Thesis in Indian Studies, the following description applies: The course requires students, in a seminar format, to review course materials from their academic program, to gauge their future academic or vocational goals, and to write a significant paper based on their academic and future interests.
Common Course Outline